2016-2017 Academic Catalog 
    
    Oct 15, 2019  
2016-2017 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


Undergraduate Prerequisites Course Numbering
A “C-” or higher is required in all prerequisite courses 100-299 - Lower division undergraduate
  300-499 - Upper division undergraduate
  500-699 - Graduate
Search Tip 700-799 - Doctoral
Use the asterisk (*) key as a wild card.
Example: Select “Prefix” NURS and enter 6* in the “Code or Number” field to return all Nursing courses at the 600 level.

 

 
  
  •  

    HIST 266 - 20th Century Europe


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course covers the two world wars; fascism, nazism and communism; postwar recovery and the Cold War, and the loss of empire.
    Cross-listed: HIST-366
  
  •  

    HIST 271 - History and Governments of Mideast


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines the rise of Islamic civilization and the development of Middle Eastern affairs to the present.
    Cross-listed: HIST-371, PSCI-371, PSCI-371
  
  •  

    HIST 272 - History Governments East Asia


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a historical study of Japan, Korea, Thailand and the countries of East Asia excluding China. For China,
    Cross-listed: HIST/PSCI 172/372
  
  •  

    HIST 273 - History and Governments of Africa


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a comparative study of the political systems of various African countries and their historic, ethnic, cultural, ideological, social and economic settings.
    Cross-listed: HIST-373, PSCI-373, PSCI-373
  
  •  

    HIST 275 - History and Governments of China


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a historical study ofChina with emphasis on developments in the last two centuries.
    Cross-listed: HIST-275, HIST-375, PSCI-375, PSCI-375
  
  •  

    HIST 284 - World War II


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will cover the military aspects of the
    Second World War, and its political, social and
    cultural aspects as well, as these affected the
    major participants. The war’s origins and
    consequences will also be considered.
  
  •  

    HIST 285 - History of England


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys English history from Stonehenge to the present with emphasis on constitutional and social development.
    Cross-listed: HIST-385
  
  •  

    HIST 287 - History and Governments of Germany


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the political history of the German-speaking people, who have played an integral part in the development of Europe and Western culture. It includes the Holy Roman Empire, the Reformation, Congress system, the unification of modern Germany, the Nazi Era, and post-war divided and reunited Germany.
    Cross-listed: HIST-387, PSCI-387, PSCI-387
  
  •  

    HIST 288 - History and Governments of Russia


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course surveys the political history of Russia and its relationship with the rest of the world. Among other things, the course covers the Kievan system, the rise of Moscow, the czarist Empire, the Soviet Union, and post-Soviet Russia.


    Cross-listed: HIST-388, PSCI-388, PSCI-388

  
  •  

    HIST 296 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    HIST 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
  •  

    HIST 297H - Honors Topics in History


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
  
  •  

    HIST 298 - Seminar in American History


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    HIST 299 - Internship


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    HIST 303 - America and The Contemp World


    Credits: Three (3)
    History of American foreign relations since World War II. (Advanced level)
    Cross-listed: HIST-103, PSCI-103, PSCI-303
  
  •  

    HIST 305 - Topics: American Cultural History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys major events, and ideas and issues in American cultural history.
    Cross-listed: HIST-105, HUM-105, HUM-305
  
  •  

    HIST 310 - Women in American History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the impact of historical events on the lives of American women and, in turn, the many roles women played in shaping American history. Topics include native American womens lives; gender and family life under slavery; the impact of industrialization on women of different classes; the ideology of separate spheres; womens political activities including the anti-slavery movement, the suffrage movement, the 19th Amendment, and the resurgence of feminism in the 1960s; and transformations in the lives of modern women including work, politics, sexuality, consumption patterns, and leisure activities.
    Cross-listed: HIST-110, WS-110, WS-310
  
  •  

    HIST 315 - History of American Indians


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores topics in Indian history including the social and natural environment of North America on the eve of European invasion; dynamics of early Indian-European encounters; causes of population decline among Native Americans; transformations of Native American social and family life; accommodations, adaptation and olitical change. The course includes a strong focus no the challenges faced by Native Americans in the 20th Century.
    Cross-listed: HIST-115
  
  •  

    HIST 316 - St Louis History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will examine the major political events and social conditions influencing the lives of the people of St. Louis from its earliest inhabitants to the present, but with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries.
    Note: Classes will consist of a mixture of discussion and lecture, with students invited to participate fully with questions, comments and ideas.
    Cross-listed: HIST-116
  
  •  

    HIST 319 - Film and American History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores films for their ability to recreate, reveal, change, or influence U.S. history. Students will view many films in and out of class and learn to analyze them as historical documents. The main focus of how historians explore, analyze, and make meaning from this area of historical evidence: films. 
    Cross-listed: HIST-119
  
  •  

    HIST 321 - U.S. History to 1877


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course covers the discovery and colonization of North America, the American Revolution, the Constitution, Federalists and Republicans, Jacksonian Democracy, Sectionalism and Civil War, and Southern Reconstruction.
    Cross-listed: HIST-121
  
  •  

    HIST 322 - U.S. History since 1877


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies 19th Century industrialization, the labor movement, imperialism, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, and the Cold War.
    Cross-listed: HIST-122
  
  •  

    HIST 325 - Topics Environmental History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies human environmental interactions over time, focusing especially on the impact of agriculture, industry, and urbanization on both the natural world and the humanized landscape.  A fundamental premise of environmental history is that nature is an active participant in human affairs, not just a passive stage for human activity. 
    Cross-listed: HIST-125
  
  •  

    HIST 326 - Historical Geography of North America


    Credits: Three (3)
    A survey of the geological, ecological, cultural and economic development of the various regions of the North American continent.
    Cross-listed: SCI-326
  
  •  

    HIST 328 - The American West


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the history of the trans- Mississippi West of the United States, including Native American history and cultures, European and Anglo-American frontiers, the expansion of the United States in the 19th century, and the interaction of Native Americans, European-Americans, Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans.
    Cross-listed: HIST-128
  
  •  

    HIST 331 - World History I: To 1500


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores significant people, movements, events, and ideas in the major civilizations of the world to about 1500.
    Cross-listed: HIST-131
  
  •  

    HIST 332 - World History II: 1500-Present


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores significant people, movements, events and ideas in the major civilizations of the world from 1500 to the present.
    Cross-listed: HIST-132
  
  •  

    HIST 361 - Early Man and Ancient Civilizations


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a study of prehistory and the origins of agriculture, the Neolithic cultures, early civilizations of the Middle East, the Greek world, the rise and fall of Rome, and early Christianity.
  
  •  

    HIST 362 - Europe in Middle Ages


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the momentous cultural and historical developments in Europe during the 1,000-year period from the collapse of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance.
    Cross-listed: HIST-262
  
  •  

    HIST 363 - Europe:Renaissance-Enlightenment


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the early modern period from the Renaissance through the Age of Discovery and the Reformation to the Enlightenment and the era of the French Revolution.
    Cross-listed: HIST-263
  
  •  

    HIST 366 - 20th Century Europe


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course covers the two world wars; fascism, Nazism and communism; postwar recovery and the Cold War, and the loss of empire.
    Cross-listed: HIST-266
  
  •  

    HIST 371 - History and Governments of Mideast


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines the rise of Islamic civilization and the development of Middle Eastern affairs to the present.
    Cross-listed: HIST-271, PSCI-371, PSCI-371
  
  •  

    HIST 372 - History Governments East Asia


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a historical study of Japan, Korea, Thailand and the countries of East Asia excluding China. For China,

     
    Cross-listed: HIST/PSCI 172

  
  •  

    HIST 373 - History and Governments of Africa


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a comparative study of the political systems of various African countries and their historic, ethnic, cultural, ideological, social and economic settings.
    Cross-listed: HIST-273, PSCI-373, PSCI-373
  
  •  

    HIST 375 - History and Governments of China


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a historical study ofChina with emphasis on developments in the last two centuries.
    Cross-listed: HIST-275, PSCI-375, PSCI-375
  
  •  

    HIST 384 - World War II


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will cover the military aspects of the
    Second World War, and its political, social and
    cultural aspects as well, as these affected the
    major participants. The war’s origins and
    consequences will also be considered.
  
  •  

    HIST 385 - History of England


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys English history from Stonehenge to the present with emphasis on constitutional and social development.
    Cross-listed: HIST-285
  
  •  

    HIST 387 - History and Governments of Germany


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the political history of the German-speaking people, who have played an integral part in the development of Europe and Western culture. It includes the Holy Roman Empire, the Reformation, Congress system, the unification of modern Germany, the Nazi Era, and post-war divided and reunited Germany.
    Cross-listed: HIST-287, PSCI-387, PSCI-387
  
  •  

    HIST 388 - History and Governments of Russia


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course surveys the political history of Russia and its relationship with the rest of the world. Among other things, the course covers the Kievan system, the rise of Moscow, the czarist Empire, the Soviet Union, and post-Soviet Russia.
    Cross-listed: HIST-288, PSCI-388, PSCI-388
  
  •  

    HIST 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 400 - History Profession


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Senior status
    This course examines the contemporary practice of professional history through an analysis of historiography, ethics and current debates. Students will gain an understanding of the current methodologies and historiographical debates in the historical profession and will analyze the major points of change in historical interpretations.
    Note: The course is required for undergraduate history majors. It is recommended that this course be taken in the senior year.
  
  •  

    HIST 402 - Readings in History


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    A tutorial reading course in significant historical works, this course is by arrangement with instructor.
    Cross-listed: HIST-202
  
  •  

    HIST 496 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    HIST 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
    Cross-listed: HIST-197, HIST-297, HIST-397
  
  •  

    HIST 498 - Seminar


    Credits: Four (4)
  
  •  

    HIST 499 - Internship


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    HONR 260H - Honors Colloquium I


    Credits: One Half (0.5)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This fall course for Bascom Honors students, which meets monthly, provides opportunity for stimulating discussion of timely topics exploring a designated semester theme. Faculty from the different schools at Maryville are invited to facilitate the sessions.
  
  •  

    HONR 261H - Honors Colloquium


    Credits: One Half (0.5)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    Honors Colloquium students attend events and performances chosen from an approved list and respond in writing.
  
  •  

    HUM 101 - Humanities: Western Culture


    Credits: Three (3)
    An interdisciplinary approach to great ideas of Western civilization, the course will proceed chronologically, beginning with the ancient Greeks.
    Cross-listed: HUM-301
  
  •  

    HUM 105 - Topics: American Cultural History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys major events, ideas and issues in American cultural history.
    Cross-listed: HIST-105, HIST-305, HUM-305
  
  •  

    HUM 108 - Minority Voices in American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    Students develop an appreciation of the literary contributions of minority Americans, primarily of Chinese, African, Puerto Rican, Japanese, Mexican, and Native American heritage.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-108, ENGL-308
  
  •  

    HUM 118 - Literary Forms: Fable to Film


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101
    The course explains the art of storytelling through an analysis of narrative techniques in fiction, drama and film.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-118, ENGL-318, HUM-318
  
  •  

    HUM 125 - Masterpieces of 20th Century Cinema


    Credits: Three (3)
    Just about everyone loves movies. But why? Which
    ones? What do we mean by a good or bad movie, let
    alone a masterpiece? What can we look for in
    evaluating a movie? How can discussion of movies
    help us to think critically and analytically,
    appreciate a significant art form, apply useful
    terminology, and understanda–orTHE–major
    medium of the 20th century? And lastly, are movies still relevant in the 21st century?
    Cross-listed: HUM-125, HUM-325
  
  •  

    HUM 126 - German Churches of Missouri


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course consists of a five-day saturation in
    the social and ecclesial history of the Germans
    who immigrated into Missouri during the 1840s and
    50s. The first two days are 3/4 lecture with a
    short afternoon trip to visit local churches.
    The next three days are all-day field trips to
    churches and museums in the German counties of
    Missouri
    Cross-listed: HUM-126, HUM-326
  
  •  

    HUM 190 - American Literature I


    Credits: Three (3)
    In this course students learn strategies of literary analysis, focusing on significant texts in American literature written before 1800. Students write at least two literary analyses, including one persuasive essay, and complete other projects and creative writing assignments.
    Note: Offered through the Advanced College Credit Program only.
  
  •  

    HUM 191 - American Literature II


    Credits: Three (3)
    In this course students learn strategies of literary analysis, focusing on significant texts in American literature written after 1800. Students write several literary analyses as well as completing other projects and creative writing assignments. The final assignment is a research paper which includes the following: an author biography, a discussion of the text’s historical significance, and a literary analysis that includes the student’s own critique as well as at least two other critiques.
    Note: Offered through the Advanced College Credit Program only.
  
  •  

    HUM 201H - Great Ideas


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101 and Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course addresses a variety of themes, giving students an overview of the intellectual history of the western world. In this course students have explored themes such as The Hero in Literature and Film and Greek Tragedy and Myth.
  
  •  

    HUM 204 - Intercultural Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces the student to selected Asian, African, and Middle Eastern cultures in order to increase global awareness and understanding and to enhance cross-cultural tolerance and communication.
  
  •  

    HUM 206H - Cultural Studies of Rock’N’Roll


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course will explore rock andamp; roll’s origins, contexts, images, lyrics, and the music itself. Students will consider how the music creates meaning and what the relationship of rock andamp; roll is to American culture and history.
    Cross-listed: FPAR-206H
  
  •  

    HUM 208H - A BEAUTIFUL MIND


    Credits: Four
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    In this course we will explore various forms of spiritual practice-prayer, meditation, and aesthetic experiences of beauty and creativity (music, literature, visual arts) and their connection with concerns of social justice. By practicing mindfulness and attention of ourselves, each other, our writing and reading, and the world we live in as well as nurturing the qualities of listening, observation, and empathy, we will become more aware of the interconnectedness of our spiritual, aesthetic, and social lives. The course will include readings from writers such as Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Simone Weil, Elaine Scarry, Daniel Berrigan, and Thich Nhat Hanh.
  
  •  

    HUM 211 - Nature and Humanity


    Credits: Three
    This course explores philosophical, literary, religious, and political conceptualizations of the relationship between the human and the non-human world. It includes topics such as animal rights, deep ecology, the notion of wilderness, environmental justice, and environmental stewardship. The class also studies the history and goals of the global environmental movement. Furthermore, it introduces students to the traditions of American nature writing.
  
  •  

    HUM 212H - Monsters in Film and Literature


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course will look at influential modern works such as Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, recent revisionism by writers such as Anne Rice and Octavia Butler, and a few of the many monster movies. Students will consider the language, structure, origins, contexts, and implications of the stories.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-212H
  
  •  

    HUM 213H - War and Peace in Literature and Film


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    Cross-listed: ENGL-213H
  
  •  

    HUM 214H - Conspiracy in Literature/Film


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This class will closely examine recent (1968-present) American novels and films in order to understand the conventions and contemporary appeal of the conspiracy narrative. The class will take an interdisciplinary approach: novels may include Thomas Pynchon’s Crying of Lot 49, Ishmael Reed’s Mumbo Jumbo, Margaret Atwood’s Bodily Harm, Don DeLillo’s Libra, Chang- Rae Lee’s Native Speaker, and Chuck Palahniuk’s Fight Club. In addition, films may include The Parallax View, The Manchurian Candidate, The Matrix, The Truman Show, and The Stepford Wives.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-214H
  
  •  

    HUM 215H - Tolkien: Medieval and Modern


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    In this course students will explore Tolkien as a medievalist and a modern writer. They will study and discuss The Lord of the Rings, Silmarillion, Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Leaf by Niggle, and On Fairy Stories, as well as the medieval texts Beowulf, the Elder Edda, and the Saga of the Volsungs.
    Note: See ENGL 215H
  
  •  

    HUM 216H - HISTORY OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM


    Credits: Four
  
  •  

    HUM 222H - The Mystery of Language


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    We speak and write every day, and yet language remains one of the greatest mysteries of our existence. Is it language that distinguishes humans from animals? Is it possible to trace the origins of human language? What is the relationship between speech and silence? Between language and experience? Between words and images? Between original and translation? What are the limits of language? Can we even define what language is? This interdisciplinary course will explore the mythological, philosophical, theological, linguistic, and literary dimensions of these and similar questions. Our readings will span 2500 years of reflections on language, from the Bible and Plato to contemporary inquiries. Along the way, we will encounter philosophers such as Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, and Heidegger, poets such as T.S. Eliot and Emily Dickinson, medieval mystics and modern linguists, and many other writers wrestling with the enigma of language.
  
  •  

    HUM 254 - Maryville Talks Movies


    Credits: Three (3)
    A community based learning experience which will bring together students,the Maryville community, and the St. Louis community to talk about significant films with important themes and ideas relevant to culture,history, art, ethics, literature, and ideas.
  
  •  

    HUM 265 - Comparative Religion and Culture


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course introduces the basic beliefs and
    practices of the major religious cultures of the
    world. By comparing these beliefs with their own,
    students better understand their own beliefs and
    practices and become aware of how people of other
    cultures think and act religiously. Students
    develop a tolerance and an appreciation for other
    cultures and a basis for fuller international
    awareness and understanding. See HUM/REL 465
    Cross-listed: HUM-265, HUM-465, REL-265, REL-465
  
  •  

    HUM 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
  •  

    HUM 301 - Cultures and Values


    Credits: Three (3)
    An interdisciplinary approach to great ideas of Western civilization, the course will proceed chronologically, beginning with the ancient Greeks.
    Cross-listed: HUM-101
  
  •  

    HUM 305 - Topics: American Cultural History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys major events, and ideas and issues in American cultural history.
    Cross-listed: HIST-105, HIST-305, HUM-105
  
  •  

    HUM 308 - Minority Voices in American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, Minimum grade C-
    Students develop an appreciation of the literary contributions of minority Americans, primarily of Chinese, African, Puerto Rican, Japanese, Mexican, and Native American heritage.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-108, HUM-108, HUM-308
  
  •  

    HUM 318 - Literary Forms: Fable to Film


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    The course explains the art of storytelling through an analysis of narrative techniques in fiction, drama and film.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-118, ENGL-318, HUM-118
  
  •  

    HUM 325 - Masterpieces of 20th Century Cinema


    Credits: Three (3)
    Just about everyone loves movies. But why? Which
    ones? What do we mean by a good or bad movie, let
    alone a masterpiece? What can we look for in
    evaluating a movie? How can discussion of movies
    help us to think critically and analytically,
    appreciate a significant art form, apply useful
    terminology, and understand a–or THE–major
    medium of the 20th century? And lastly, are movies still relevant in the 21st century?
    Cross-listed: HUM-125, HUM-325
  
  •  

    HUM 326 - German Churches of Missouri


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course consists of a five-day saturation in
    the social and ecclesial history of the Germans
    who immigrated into Missouri during the 1840s and
    50s. The first two days are 3/4 lecture with a
    short afternoon trip to visit local churches.
    The next three days are all-day field trips to
    churches and museums in the German counties of
    Missouri
    Cross-listed: HUM-126, HUM-326
  
  •  

    HUM 328 - Women in Sacred Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides an in-depth study of the historical roots and societal context of women’s religious experience in the traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. By using the Hebrew scriptures, the Christian New Testament, and the Islamic Koran, students explore the major contributions women have made and are making in humanity’s ongoing effort to understand and interpret faith.
    Cross-listed: REL-328, WS-328
  
  •  

    HUM 360 - Theatre in St Louis


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies dramatic literature and performance through viewing, discussing and writing about professional, academic and community theatre productions in the St. Louis area.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-360
  
  •  

    HUM 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
  
  •  

    HUM 455 - Lit/Phil of Environment


    Credits: Three (3)
    An introduction to the intellectual foundations of the environmental movement. Students will read and discuss the major 19th Century writers who were the source of the environmental movement and become acquainted with the philosophical ideas that underpin the movement. Students also will learn about an ensemble of artists who have contributed to and drawn inspiration from the environmental movement.
    Cross-listed: PHIL-455
  
  •  

    HUM 465 - Comparative Religion and Culture


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course introduces the basic beliefs and practices of the major religious cultures of the world. By comparing these beliefs with their own, students better understand their own beliefs and practices and become aware of how people of other cultures think and act religiously. Students develop a tolerance and an appreciation for other cultures and a basis for fuller international awareness and understanding.
    Cross-listed: REL-465
  
  •  

    HUM 475 - Environmental Ethics


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies modes of reasoning and ethical decision making applied to environmental issues. It analyzes the many factors to be considered by both the public and the planners in developing environmental policies.
  
  •  

    HUM 495 - Research in the Humanities


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104, or ENGL- 204H; Minimum grade C-
    The student undertakes and completes a substantial research project under the direction of a full-time faculty member in Humanities.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-495
  
  •  

    HUM 496 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    HUM 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, Minimum grade C-
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
  •  

    HUM 498 - Capstone Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
  
  •  

    INTD 101 - University Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    The University Seminar introduces freshmen to higher education and helps them develop skills that will enhance their experience as college students. All seminars focus on three goals: critical thinking, community, and communication. To accomplish these goals, faculty engage students in a variety of activities, such as writing, oral presentations, research, critical reading, and conversations. In the seminars, freshmen are challenged to become independent, creative, and critical thinkers; they participate in the university community of scholars; and they learn to articulate and defend their ideas. Students choose from a wide selection of seminars in which they explore a theme through literature, art, music, films, or other media.
  
  •  

    INTD 201 - Leadership Colloquium


    Credits: One Half (0.5)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Institute for Leadership and Values
    Guest speakers explore with students a variety of leadership topics.
  
  •  

    INTD 202 - Leadership Colloquium


    Credits: One Half (0.5)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Institute for Leadership and Values
    Guest speakers explore with students a variety of leadership topics.
  
  •  

    INTD 301 - Seminar, Ethics and Leadership


    Credits: One Half (0.5)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Institute for Leadership and Values
    Students explore the ways in which values shape the decisions that leaders make.
  
  •  

    INTD 401 - Leadership Practicum


    Credits: One Half (0.5)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Institute for Leadership and Values
    Students participate in the development and implementation of leadership programs and reflection opportunities.
  
  •  

    INTD 402 - Leadership Practicum


    Credits: One Half (0.5)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Institute for Leadership and Values
    Students participate in the development and implementation of leadership programs and reflection opportunities.
  
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    INTL 498 - International Studies Capstone


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course consists of an independent research project, under the guidance and supervision of a faculty member. The student writes a substantial paper on a topic chosen by the student and approved by the instructor.
  
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    ISYS 100 - Computer Applications


    Credits: Three (3)
    Course broadly covers microcomputer hardware and software concepts; hands-on experience with operating system software and application software packages: word processing, spreadsheet, database, desktop publishing and presentation graphics.
    Note: A competency exam is available.
  
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    ISYS 101 - Techtools: Exploring Windows 8 and Office 2013


    Credits: One (1)
    Microsoft Windows 8 is a major new release of the world’s most popular operating system that consolidates the interface used on desktop, web and mobile devices.A new version of Office 2013 will soon follow. This one credit hour, on-line TechTools course is designed to introduce you to thetechnology, expose you to the on-line resources that support the technology and provide an opportunity for hands-on exercises to develop the basic skills to implement the technology.


  
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    ISYS 102 - Techtools: Exploring SQL And MySQL


    Credits: One (1)
    Prerequisite: ISYS-100
    Structured Query Language (SQL) is the language of databases used throughout the world across dozens of commercial applications and MySQL is the open source database software used for many commercial databases.This one credit hour, on-line Tech Tools course is designed to introduce you to the technology, expose you to the on-line resources that support the technology and provide an opportunity for hands-on exercises to develop the basic skills to implement the technology.
  
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    ISYS 103 - Techtools: Java Programming Basics


    Credits: One (1)
    Prerequisite: ISYS-100
    This course introduces the basics of developing applications with the Java programming language. Students will learn basic Java programming concepts through hands-on exercises and small projects. No prior programming experience is necessary. This one credit hour, on-line Tech Tools course is designed to introduce you to the technology, expose you to the on-line resources that support the technology and provide an opportunity for hands-on exercises to develop the basic skills to implement the technology.
  
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    ISYS 104 - Techtools: Exploring Javascript


    Credits: One (1)
    Prerequisite: ISYS-390
    JavaScript is the most popular scripting language for adding interaction to web pages in all major browsers, such as Internet Explorer, FireFox, Chrome, Opera and Safari. This one credit hour, on-line TechTools course is designed to introduce you to the technology, expose you to the on-line resources that support the technology and provide an oopportunity for hands-on exercises to develop the basic skills to implement the technology.


  
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    ISYS 106 - Techtools: Exploring Techtools for the Job Search


    Credits: One (1)
    Prerequisite: ISYS-100
    Your job search and career development are now primarily online tasks involving social media applications, application sites and search engines. This one credit, online TechTools course is designed to introduce you to the technology, expose you to the online resources that support the technoloogy and provide an opportunity for hands-on exercises to develop the basic skills to implement the technology.
  
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    ISYS 108 - Techtools: Exploring Online Collaboration


    Credits: One (1)
    Your live.maryville.edu account includes access to “cloud-based” Microsoft Office applications like Excel, Word and Powerpoint. It also includes online storage through SkyDrive and the ability to collaborate andshare documents with groups. This one credit hour, on-line Tech Tools course is designed to introduce you to online collaboration technology, expose you to the on-line resources that support the technology and provide an opportunity for hands-on exercises to develop the basic skills to implement the technology.
 

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