2016-2017 Academic Catalog 
    
    Oct 29, 2020  
2016-2017 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


Undergraduate Prerequisites Course Numbering
A “C-” or higher is required in all prerequisite courses 100-299 - Lower division undergraduate
  300-499 - Upper division undergraduate
  500-699 - Graduate
Search Tip 700-799 - Doctoral
Use the asterisk (*) key as a wild card.
Example: Select “Prefix” NURS and enter 6* in the “Code or Number” field to return all Nursing courses at the 600 level.

 

 
  
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    PHYS 104L - Required Lab Phys 104


    Credits: Zero (0)
    Corequisite: PHYS-104

    Required lab - PHYS 104
  
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    PHYS 105 - Astronomy


    Credits: Three (3)
    Astronomy presents a survey of celestial bodies, the means of gathering information on them, and theories of their origin and evolution.
    Cross-listed: SCI-105
  
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    PHYS 120 - The Physics of Light and Sound Waves


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course covers basic concepts of light, color, visual phenomena, and the physical principles involved in the description, generation, and reproduction of sound. See SCI 120
    Cross-listed: SCI-120
  
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    PHYS 153 - Calculus-Based Physics I


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: MATH-151; minimum grade C-
    This course studies many basic principles physicists use to understand the world. Through engaged learning, demonstrations and laboratory work, students will use calculus and other mathematics to study classical mechanics and thermodynamics.
  
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    PHYS 154 - Calculus-Based Physics II


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: PHYS-153; Minimum grade C-
    This course surveys many basic principles physicists use to understand the world. Through lectures, demonstrations and laboratory work, students will use calculus and other mathematics to study wave motion, sound, electricity, magnetism, light and quantum mechanics.
  
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    PHYS 222 - Meteorology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Meteorology is the scientific study of Earths weather and climates, including the structure and composition of the atmosphere, and how the elements of temperature, pressure, moisture, and energy interact to produce various weather phenomena. Current events in weather, including extreme weather and environmental concerns, also will be emphasized.
    Cross-listed: SCI-222
  
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    PHYS 296 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    PHYS 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    PHYS 350 - Current Topics in Physics


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will emphasize a current topic in physics including but not limited to string theory, chaos theory, or multi-universe theory. This course will involve reading and discussion of the current topic.
  
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    PHYS 440 - Modern Physics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PHYS-103 and PHYS-104
    Modern physics presents the theory of relativity, introductory quantum theory, atomic structure of matter, physical properties of solids, and nuclear structure.
  
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    PHYS 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    PHYS 498 - Seminar


    Credits: Two (2)
  
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    PSCI 101 - American Government


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies the organization, operation and development of the American national political system.
    Note: It fulfills the Missouri state requirement.
  
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    PSCI 102 - Introduction to World Politics


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is an introductory survey of the features of the global system of states in anarchy. It explores the rudiments of fundamental questions of global politics, including how foreign policy is made, the causes of war, the incentives for international cooperation, and the emergence of international norms. It also provides a grounding of world geography.
  
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    PSCI 103 - America and The Contemporary World


    Credits: Three (3)
    History of American foreign relations since World War II.
    Cross-listed: HIST-103, HIST-303, PSCI-303
  
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    PSCI 108 - Comparative Politics


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies several Western, Communist/former Communist, and Third World political systems using comparative analysis.
  
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    PSCI 110 - Political Ideologies


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies major political philosophers, from Plato to Marx, and their contributions to political theory.
    Cross-listed: PHIL-110, PHIL-310, PSCI-310
  
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    PSCI 197 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
  
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    PSCI 231 - International Law


    Credits: Three (3)

    This course surveys the content of public international law and the theories by which states create and comply with it. It covers the principles of state sovereignty, the law of diplomatic relations, regulations on human rights and the use of military force, the law of territory, and legal measures to protect the environment.

  
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    PSCI 271 - History and Governments of Mideast


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines the rise of Islamic civilization and the development of Middle Eastern affairs to the present.
    Cross-listed: PSCI-371, HIST-371, HIST-371
  
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    PSCI 272 - History Governments East Asia


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a historical study of Japan, Korea, Thailand and the countries of East Asia excluding China. For China,
    Cross-listed: HIST/PSCI 172/372
  
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    PSCI 273 - History and Governments of Africa


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a comparative study of the political systems of various African countries and their historic, ethnic, cultural, ideological, social and economic settings.
    Cross-listed: HIST-273, HIST-373, PSCI-373
  
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    PSCI 275 - History and Governments of China


    Credits: Three (3)
  
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    PSCI 287 - History and Governments of Germany


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the political history of the German-speaking people, who have played an integral part in the development of Europe and Western culture. It includes the Holy Roman Empire, the Reformation, Congress system, the unification of modern Germany, the Nazi Era, and post-war divided and reunited Germany.
    Cross-listed: HIST-287, HIST-387, PSCI-387
  
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    PSCI 288 - History and Goverments of Russia


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course surveys the political history of Russia and its relationship with the rest of the world. Among other things, the course covers the Kievan system, the rise of Moscow, the czarist Empire, the Soviet Union, and post-Soviet Russia.
    Cross-listed: HIST-288, HIST-388, PSCI-388
  
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    PSCI 296 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    PSCI 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    PSCI 298 - Seminar in Political Science


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    PSCI 299 - Internship


    Credits: One (1) to Twelve (12)
  
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    PSCI 303 - America and Contemp World


    Credits: Three (3)
    History of American foreign relations since World War II.
    Cross-listed: HIST-103, HIST-303, PSCI-103
  
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    PSCI 310 - Political Ideologies


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the major political ideologies in the United Statesand worldwide, including liberalism, conservatism, the far left, and the far right.
    Cross-listed: PSCI-110
  
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    PSCI 315 - Congress and the Legislative Process


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies the political bases,
    structures, and functions of Congress. It
    examines Congress’s interaction in political
    leadership and policy making, both internally and
    with other branches of the Federal government.
  
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    PSCI 317 - American Constitutional Law


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies development of constitutional law from the beginning of the Republic to the Rehnquist Court.
    Note: It fulfills the Missouri state requirement.
  
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    PSCI 319 - Civil Liberties/Rights


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines modern civil rights and civil liberties issues, including freedom of expression, due process, right to privacy, affirmative action, and womens constitutional issues.
    Note: It fulfills the Missouri state requirement.
  
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    PSCI 371 - History and Governments of Mideast


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines the rise of Islamic civilization and the development of Middle Eastern affairs to the present.
    Cross-listed: PSCI-271, HIST-371, HIST-371
  
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    PSCI 372 - History Governments East Asia


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a historical study of Japan, Korea, Thailand and the countries of East Asia excluding China. For China,
    Cross-listed: HIST/PSCI 172
  
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    PSCI 373 - History and Governments of Africa


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a comparative study of the political systems of various African countries and their historic, ethnic, cultural, ideological, social and economic settings.
    Cross-listed: HIST-273, HIST-373, PSCI-273
  
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    PSCI 375 - History and Governments of China


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a historical study of Chinese
    history and governments with emphasis on
    developments in the last two centuries.


    Cross-listed: PSCI-275, PSCI-375, HIST-375, HIST-375

  
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    PSCI 376 - Ethics Of War


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the ethical dimensions of the use of military force up to and including war, both by states and by non-state actors. It covers not only the decisions and justifications of using force in the first place, but also the methods and means of force, once employed. The course will survey a variety of sources of military ethics, including international law, secular political philosophy, and the war ethics in various world religions.
    Cross-listed: PHIL-376
  
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    PSCI 387 - History and Governments of Germany


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the political history of the German-speaking people, who have played an integral part in the development of Europe and Western culture. It includes the Holy Roman Empire, the Reformation, Congress system, the unification of modern Germany, the Nazi Era, and post-war divided and reunited Germany.
    Cross-listed: HIST-287, HIST-387, PSCI-287
  
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    PSCI 388 - History and Governments of Russia


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course surveys the political history of Russia and its relationship with the rest of the world. Among other things, the course covers the Kievan system, the rise of Moscow, the czarist Empire, the Soviet Union, and post-Soviet Russia.
    Cross-listed: HIST-288, HIST-388, PSCI-288
  
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    PSCI 395 - Model United Nations


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course consists of a study of the politics and constitutions of selected international organizations. Students will acquire advanced practical training as public speakers and rhetors, and refine their skills in parliamentary procedure, issue advocacy, persuasion, argumentation, and consensus building. Students may repeat the course for credit.
    Cross-listed: COMM-395
  
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    PSCI 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
  
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    PSCI 402 - Advanced International Relations


    Credits: Three (3)

    This course is a deep application and synthesis of international relations concepts and theories to international problems. Students will examine the primary literature and topics that have the attention of the professionals in the field, and deepen their applied knowledge of world politics through online simulation.

  
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    PSCI 496 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    PSCI 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptons at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    PSCI 498 - Seminar


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    PSCI 499 - Internship


    Credits: One (1) to Nine (9)
  
  •  

    PSYC 101 - General Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    An introductory survey of psychology. Psychology as a field is very broad, and we will be examining most of the major sub-areas that comprise psychology, including the development of psychology as a science, learning and memory, biological foundations of behavior, sensation and perception, human development, motivation and emotions, cognition, abnormal psychology, and social psychology. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and understanding the scientific methods used in the discipline.
  
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    PSYC 105 - Introduction to Leadership


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the nature of leadership from a multidisciplinary perspective. Emphasis is placed on helping students gain a better understanding of what makes for good leadership. Students will study classic and contemporary leadership theories, and then explore options to develop their personal leadership potential.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-105
  
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    PSYC 202H - Psyc Honors: Thinking Like a Social Scientist


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This seminar course introduces students to the research methods and principles of psychological science. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and understanding the scientific methods used in the social sciences.
    Note: This course fulfills the requirement of PSYC 101.
  
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    PSYC 210 - Careers in Social Science


    Credits: One
    This course provides students with career information within the broad field of the social sciences (psychology, sociology, organizational leadership, etc).  Students will develop a career plan by being given guidance on how to research occupations, apply to graduate programs and internships, create personal statements, develop a resume, and find jobs using their chosen degree within the social sciences.  
    Cross-listed: SOC 210
  
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    PSYC 228 - Introduction to Positive Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Positive Psychology is an emerging field that involves the study of satisfaction among workers, policies that result in the strongest civic engagement, and how people’s lives can be most worth living. Positive Psychology focuses on building factors such as resilience, coping skills, protective factors, and strengths so that people may not just face and manage the problems of life but flourish and thrive. This course will involve an exploration of positive emotion, meaning and purpose, positive relationships, and positive accomplishments. Students will also learn about factors that influence levels of happiness, and strategies to increase well-being, life satisfaction, and longevity.
    Cross-listed: HEPR-228
  
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    PSYC 240 - Critical Thinking in Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-101F or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores the importance of scientific critical thinking and ethics as they relate to advancing scientific knowledge, understanding, and application of knowledge in the Social Sciences. Students will develop a firm theoretical and scientific background related to scientific critical thinking and values in the Social Sciences to become critical thinkers within their disciplines.
  
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    PSYC 254 - Human Development through the Lifespan


    Credits: Three (3)
    A knowledge of normal growth and development is essential to professional practice in many disciplines. This course explores the process of human development, particularly in Western cultures. A holistic life-span approach is used to promote an understanding of the biophysical, cognitive, affective, social, and spiritual functioning of healthy individuals.
  
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    PSYC 260 - Crisis Intrvention


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is an essential foundation for people who anticipate or are presently working with individuals in crisis situations such as suicide, rape, spouse abuse, death and addictions. The course focuses on theory and practical application of crisis intervention techniques.
  
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    PSYC 296 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    PSYC 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    PSYC 310 - Psychology of Stress and Health


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course examines the interaction of biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors in promoting health and preventing illness. You will learn an overview of psychological research methods, theories, and principles for stress management that can be applied to enhance approaches for promoting health. Topics include but are not limited to factors underlying health habits and lifestyles, methods to enhance health behavior and prevent illness, and stress management.
  
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    PSYC 311 - Child Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores child development from birth through late childhood. Topics span biological, cognitive, language, social, emotional, and moral development. The interaction of nature and nurture (genes and environment) is emphasized, including the effects of different social and cultural contexts on children’s development, and implications for parenting decisions and educational practices.
  
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    PSYC 314 - Adolescent Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores development during adolescence. Topics span biological, cognitive, language, social, emotional, and moral development. The interaction of nature and nurture (genes and environment) is emphasized, including the effects of different social and cultural contexts on adolescent development, and implications for parenting decisions and educational practices.
  
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    PSYC 320 - Personality


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores major personality theories including Freudian, neo-Freudian, behaviorism, humanism, and contemporary theories of personality as well as empirically based applications.
  
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    PSYC 321 - Abnormal Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course covers the domains of psychopathology as it is represented in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Students will examine the nature, course, symptoms, consequences, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Current empirically-based treatments and evidenced-based practices will be reviewed.
  
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    PSYC 322 - Child Abnormal Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course covers the domains of child psychopathology as it is represented in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Students will examine the nature, course, symptoms, consequences, and treatment of abnormal behavior in children. Current empirically-based treatments and evidenced-based practices for specific treatment of children will be reviewed.
    Note: A course in developmental psychology or abnormal psychology is the prerequisite for this course.
  
  •  

    PSYC 325 - Social Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Social psychology is the scientific study of how people think about, influence, relate to one another, and ultimately create meaning. It involves understanding how people affect, and are affected by, others around them. This course introduces you to the theory, empirical findings, and research methods of social psychology. You will develop the ability to analyze social situations that you encounter in your everyday lives through the application of theory and methods in social psychology.
    Cross-listed: SOC-325
  
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    PSYC 326 - Criminal Psychology


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, SOC-202H, PSYC-101, PSYC-202H or CRIM-102
    The purpose of this course is to understand the dynamics of criminal behavior. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the course will explore the major socialiological, criminological, and psychological theories
    attempting to explain criminal activity. 

     
    Cross-listed: CRIM/SOC 326

  
  •  

    PSYC 328 - Mental Illness and Society


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course addresses mental illness and its impact on various institutions of society.The definitions and symptoms of mental illnesses will be presented.The focus will be on how mental illness impacts societal institutions, including criminal justice, occupational, educational, and others.Particular emphasis is placed on problems and limitations in the mental health system and how society is adversely affected by those problems.The course objective is to learn a realistic appraisal of mental illnesses and effective philosophies and methodologies to begin correcting problems related to mental illness in society.
    Cross-listed: SOC-328
  
  •  

    PSYC 330 - Human Sexuality


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course surveys the social, biological, and psychological aspects of human sexual behavior. Scientific research related to sexual anatomy, arousal, gender, and life span sexual behavior will be explored. Topics may also include but are not limited to sexual orientation, cultural variations in attraction and love, and sexual morality.
    Cross-listed: SOC-330
  
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    PSYC 340 - Social Aspects of the Aged


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or SOC-101
    This course examines the problems and issues relevant to America’s elderly population, focusing on financial concerns, public policy, health and institutionalization.
    Cross-listed: SOC-340
  
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    PSYC 341 - Understanding Statistical Inference


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: MATH 115 or higher; Minimum grade C-
    This course introduces students to both descriptive and inferential statistics. The following concepts and techniques are included: measures of central tendency and variability; sampling distributions; interval estimation; hypothesis testing (t-test, ANOVA); correlation and regression; chi square tests. Statistical software projects are required.

     
    Cross-listed: CRIM/SOC 341

  
  •  

    PSYC 342 - Research Methods


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course introduces the process of scientific research in the social and behavioral sciences and the fundamental role research methodology plays in our understanding of human behavior and social affairs. Students will explore the principles, ethics, and methods of social science research (correlational research, observational and survey methods, experimental and quasi-experimental design, variable control, secondary data analysis, and interpretation of results). Students will become familiar with the ways social scientists communicate their research to other scientists by writing a formal research paper.
    Note: Note: To ensure students success it is strongly recommended that students complete PSYC 341 before enrolling in PSYC 342 or that they enroll in PSYC 341 concurrently with PSYC 342. See CRIM/SOC 342..
    Cross-listed: CRIM-342, SOC-342
  
  •  

    PSYC 351 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-101F, or PSYC-202H
    This course explores the discipline of industrial and organizational psychology, the scientific study of psychology applied to work. Topics include but are not limited to selection, recruitment, psychological assessment, performance management, learning and development, organization assessment, organization attitudes and behavior, and workplace psychological health.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-351
  
  •  

    PSYC 352 - Counseling


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course presents an overview of the major counseling theories and techniques. Particular emphasis is placed on the key concepts of each theory, the role of the therapist/clinician, therapeutic goals, and the principal techniques that follow from each theory. Cultural, legal, and ethical issues facing counselors are addressed as well as strategies for employing basic counseling skills.
  
  •  

    PSYC 355 - Personnel Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-101F, PSYC-202H, Minimum grade C-
    This course examines the application of psychological research and theory to effective human resource management in organizations. Particular emphasis is given to recruitment, selection, performance management, learning and development, and the social and legal context of personnel psychology.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-355
  
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    PSYC 358 - Psychological Tests and Measurement


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or PSYC-202H and PSYC/SOC/CRIM-341; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores the application of principles underlying the theory, interpretation, and administration of psychological tests, including tests of intelligence, achievement, personality, and ability. Students will learn how theories, principles, and concepts are applied in educational, clinical, and employment settings, and will compute and interpret basic psychometric statistics.
  
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    PSYC 365 - Multicultural Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is intended to introduce and familiarize students with the concept of multicultural psychology. The course will address issues of human diversity theory and research that are emphasized by the American Psychological Association, including age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, language, and SES. The course will also encompass issues related to identity, oppression, bias, acculturation, and workplace diversity, as well as research methodologies utilized to promote greater understanding.
  
  •  

    PSYC 370 - Forensic Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course will provide students with information on the various activities and roles forensic psychologists and other mental health professionals play both in the field of psychology and the legal system. The course covers forensic topics including: serial killers, sex offenders, terrorism, the insanity defense, the etiology of aggression, and the treatment of offenders reintegrating into society post offense. Additional topics may include: violence risk threat assessment, child abuse/neglect, polygraph examinations, mental health law, and false confessions.
  
  •  

    PSYC 385 - Evolutionary Psychology


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: PSYC 101
    This course explores how biological evolution relates to human psychology. Students will learn how evolutionary principles apply to psychological theory and research, covering topics that include romantic relationships, family relationships (including parenting and sibling dynamics), friendship and cooperation, judgment and decision making, clinical pathology, and religious belief.
  
  •  

    PSYC 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-

    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptons at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.

  
  •  

    PSYC 401 - History and Systems of Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course will explore major theoretical systems of psychology. Emphasis will be on Philosophy and science backgrounds of psychology and integration of recent trends. Development of theories and causes of events in academic and applied psychology will also be explored.
  
  •  

    PSYC 420 - Psychology of Women


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course provides an opportunity to apply critical thinking and principles of feminist psychology to evaluating psychological theories and research in the areas of psychological development and functioning of women.
    Cross-listed: WS-420
  
  •  

    PSYC 421 - Psychology of Learning


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course focuses on the theoretical and applied perspectives of learning. Students will explore theories and applications of Pavlovian and operant conditioning, observational learning, and social cognitive theory.
  
  •  

    PSYC 431 - Substance Abuse


    Credits: Three (3)
    The purpose of this course is to explore the impact of drug use and/or abuse on the lives of people and to assist students in gaining a realistic perspective of substance use related to problems in society. The course accentuates the impact of addictive substances on the body.


    Cross-listed: REHB-431

  
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    PSYC 435 - Human Cognition


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course covers the fundamentals of human cognition including processes such as perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, and decision-making. The course will begin with a general discussion of cognition and its neural bases. The course will be divided into three sections: a) cognitive neuroscience, perception, and attention, b) theories of memory and knowledge representation, c) language, problem solving, and decision-making.
  
  •  

    PSYC 440 - Sensation and Perception


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is an introduction to sensation and perception. Each of the major sensory systems will be covered focusing on anatomy, physiology, and the neural responses stimuli produce. We will also focus on perception and how we ultimately make sense out of raw stimuli such as light, sound, or pressure waves.
  
  •  

    PSYC 441 - Advanced Applied Statistics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-341, SOC-341, or CRIM-341; Minimum grade C-
    This course builds upon material introduced in PSYC/SOC/CRIM 341, Understanding Statistical Inference. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered in this course, as are multivariate methods. In most research, multiple variables are examined simultaneously. The overall goal is to become proficient using SPSS to conduct various analyses and accurately interpret both the data and the results.
  
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    PSYC 451 - Biological Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course surveys the connection between biological systems and human behavior. Topics range from sleep and dreams to drugs, stress and health, memory, emotion, and psychological disorders. Primary attention is given to different parts of the brain, neurotransmitters, hormones, etc. Emphasis is given to the interaction of nature and nurture, neural flexibility (neuroplasticity), and prospects for individual change.
  
  •  

    PSYC 454 - Cognitive Development


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Cognitive development is an upper division elective for psychology majors examining the course of biological, psychological and social emotional development in humans. The course will focus on early development and the systems of attachment, memory, emotions and states of mind. Development will be discussed in terms of the implications of early relationships on the developing mind.
  
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    PSYC 460 - Sport and Exercise Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    The field of Sport and Exercise Psychology is primarily concerned with the study of psychological factors and skills that impact sport performance and exercise participation. The psychological foundations of physical activity, the mental aspects of sports, the theoretical basis of mental training processes and competition, and basic issues in performance psychology are reviewed.
  
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    PSYC 461 - Applied Sport Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Applied Sport Psychology involves the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and the practice of mental skills, reflection on one’s own mental skills, critique of mental skills assessment and mental skills utility, and the preliminary development of a performance enhancement program. This course examines the psychological foundations of physical activity, the mental aspects of sports, the theoretical basis of mental training processes and competition, and basic issues in performance psychology. Psychological tools as they apply to coaching effectiveness and exercise psychology will also be examined.
  
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    PSYC 472 - Understanding Organizational Behavior


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Organizational behavior is the scientific study of how people think, feel, and behave in and around organizations. It is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates knowledge from psychology, sociology, and organizational sciences. The purpose of this course is to examine the foundational theories in organizational behavior and their application for the purpose of improving organization effectiveness and individual well-being.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-472, SOC-472
  
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    PSYC 473 - Group Dynamics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course focuses on the scientific study of sociological and psychological processes in groups. We will explore the theoretical explanations for group processes and the practical application of theory into groups. Topics include but are not limited to theoretical perspectives in group dynamics, group formation and development, structure of groups, group processes, and team effectiveness.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-473, SOC-473
  
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    PSYC 474 - Social Conflict and Negotiation


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course will explore social science theory and practice as it relates to social conflict and negotiation in a variety of situations. Students will gain an understanding of the theoretical frameworks for social conflict and negotiation, and learn to apply theory to not only minimize the dysfunctions of conflict but also facilitate the constructive functions of conflict in their everyday lives.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-474
  
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    PSYC 475 - Psychology of Trauma


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This psychology of trauma course explores the nature and dynamics of trauma and healing and the range of posttraumatic reactions. Particular focus is placed on understanding the difficulties people face in response to life-threatening situations (e.g., abuse, natural disaster, genocide, war, human trafficking).
  
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    PSYC 477 - Police Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or PSYC 202H; and CRIM 102
    This course explores psychological principles as applied to aspects of police officer’s career. Some of the topics to be examined are: the unique psychological stresses of police work, the effects of that stress on both the officer and his or her family; identification and management of the problem police officer; psychology of crowds; riots and their effective control; and the application of psychological principles to detective work. The interpersonal dynamics of the police with civilian complainants, victims, and violent, aggressive individuals will also be covered
    Cross-listed: CRIM-477
  
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    PSYC 478 - Drugs and Addiction


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or PSYC 202H; and CRIM 102
    This course examines substance abuse and addiction through the lenses of psychology and criminal justice, examining both why individuals abuse drugs and the role of this activity in criminal behavior. The psychological and biological theories explaining drug abuse and addition will be covered. We will also examine the impacts of drug abuse and addiction on crime
    Cross-listed: CRIM-478
  
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    PSYC 480 - Senior Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-341 and PSYC-342 with minimum grade of C-, and Senior status
    This course is the culminating, capstone experience in the social science curriculum. Students will review and discuss their course of study and its application beyond graduation. Students will work with a social science faculty member toward the completion of a research project intended to explore an area of interest in the student’s field of study.
    Note: Successful completion of Senior Seminar is achieved upon completion of the student project.
    Cross-listed: CRIM-480, ORGL-480, SOC-480
  
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    PSYC 490 - Social Service in St. Louis


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is designed to give students an introduction to the vast network of social service agencies and community mental health providers in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area. The course includes site visits to various agencies and discussions with representative social service practitioners from programs in chemical and drug dependency, community corrections and crime prevention, crisis intervention, domestic violence, mental health, and other human service areas.
    Cross-listed: SOC-490
  
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    PSYC 491 - Organization Consulting


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides students with applied experience in organization assessment and consulting. Student consultants will apply concepts and methods to assess a real client organization in order to help them improve effectiveness. You will develop foundational knowledge on collecting, analyzing, and feeding back assessment information to the client. The course will help you build your resume while providing pro-bono services to a non-profit organization.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-491
  
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    PSYC 492 - Organization Consulting Interventions


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides students with applied experience in the design and delivery of leadership and organization effectiveness interventions. The focus of the course is on designing, implementing, and evaluating an intervention with a real client organization. As an undergraduate student, you will develop foundational knowledge on designing and evaluating empirically supported interventions. The course will help you build your resume while providing pro-bono services to a non-profit organization.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-492
 

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