2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
    Nov 28, 2021  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


Undergraduate Prerequisites Course Numbering
A “C-” or higher is required in all prerequisite courses 100-299 - Lower division undergraduate
  300-499 - Upper division undergraduate
  500-699 - Graduate
Search Tip 700-799 - Doctoral
Use the asterisk (*) key as a wild card.
Example: Select “Prefix” NURS and enter 6* in the “Code or Number” field to return all Nursing courses at the 600 level.

 

 
  
  •  

    FIN 401 - Financial Industry Exam Preparation 1


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course prepares students for licensing in the securities industry. The course exposes students to topics in the securities industry, including governmental regulation, necessary documentation, the role of a broker/dealer, the role of a registered representative, opening client accounts, equity securities, debt securities, options, funds, annuities, and suitability requirements.


  
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    FIN 415 - Securities Analysis/Investment Techniques


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-312
    Students are introduced to financial investment alternatives, security markets, analytical techniques and portfolio management theories.
  
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    FIN 420 - Sport Finance


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-312
    This course explores contemporary examples from marketing sponsorship, facility construction and sport law to illustrate the crucial role that money plays in any sport business. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the receipt, disbursement and utilization of funds can foster future growth in the sport businesses. The course will deal with such issues as sports financial analysis, capital structuring and capital budgeting, profitable distribution systems and the management of financial risk.
    Cross-listed: SPTM-420
  
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    FIN 421 - Portfolio Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-415
    A study of the practical management of portfolios containing varied financial assets, the course examines the issues in, and the procedures for, portfolio management. The emphasis is on personal portfolio management by individual investors. The course assumes a basic knowledge of securities and personal financial planning.


  
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    FIN 430 - Money and Banking


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ECON-201 and ECON-202
    This course helps students understand the functions of money and the financial system in the economy. Students will analyze interest rates and the applications of the time-value-of-money concept. They will learn the basics of central banking and the Federal Reserve System. After taking this course, students will understand the workings of the financial system and the goals and limitations of monetary policy; they will have a more informed perspective on the various issues surrounding money, banking, and government policies related to money and banking.


    Cross-listed: ECON-430

  
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    FIN 450 - Financial Planning


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-215
    This course involves the study of financial planning and the process involved in helping clients determine and meet their financial objectives. Investment strategies and wealth management will be considered along with retirement planning and the transfer of an individual’s estate after death.


  
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    FIN 470 - International Trade and Money


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ECON-201 and ECON-202
    This course studies the economic principles involved in international trade and finance. It is designed to provide the student with the conceptual tools needed to analyze such international economic issues as import tariffs and quotas, import liberalization, loss of jobs to foreign countries, free-trade agreements, and exchange-rate fluctuations. The general topics to be covered in this course include the pure theory of trade, the theory of trade policy (such as trade restrictions and economic integration), international economic institutions, foreign-exchange markets and exchange rates, and the international monetary system.


    Cross-listed: ECON-470

  
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    FIN 491 - Finance Senior Experience


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will gain experience as an intern or will participate in a specialized finance project which relates directly to their career choice in finance. Emphasis will be put on current events in the field offinance.

     

  
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    FIN 496 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    FIN 499 - Financial Services Internship


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Permission of supervising faculty
    Internship in Financial Services.
  
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    FIN 601 - Financial Industry Exam Preparation 1


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-630
    This course prepares students for licensing in the securities industry. The course exposes students to topics in the securities industry, including governmental regulation, necessary documentation, the role of a broker/dealer, the role of a registered representative, opening client accounts, equity securities, debt securities, options, funds, annuities, and suitability requirements. Additionally, this course challenges student to apply security industry fundamentals through projects and case studies.


  
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    FIN 620 - Financial Statement Analysis


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will provide the skills necessary to interpret and analyze financial statement information by discussing the four key financial statementsand analyzing the financial information to evaluate profitability, liquidity and risk. Topics also covered include traditional ratio analysis and interpretation, accounting rules and quality of earnings, warning signs of financial distress, and SEC reporting requirements.
  
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    FIN 621 - Investment Alternatives And Portfolio Construction


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-630
    The practical management of portfolios containing varied financial assets. This course examines the issues in, and the procedures for, portfolio management. There is an emphasis on personal portfolio management by individual investors.
  
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    FIN 625 - Financial Institutions, Money and the Economy


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-630
    This course helps students understand the functions of money and the financial system in the economy. It examines the functions and main products and services of the major types of financial institutions, and how they manage their business risks.  Students will analyze the operations of – and the issues faced by – commercial banks, thrifts, insurance companies, mutual funds, pension funds, finance companies, venture capital firms, investment banks, and brokerage firms.

    Students will review the applications of the time-value-of-money concept and analyze the behavior of interest rates. They will study the economics of money supply, the banking system, and monetary policy.  Students will learn the basics of central banking and the Federal Reserve System.  After taking this course, students will understand the workings of the financial system and the goals and limitations of monetary policy; they will have a more-informed perspective on the various issues surrounding money, finance, and government policies related to money and banking.

     

  
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    FIN 630 - Corporate Financial Policies


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ACCT-610
    Students examine areas of concern for financial managers: the financial analysis of the firm, including ratio analysis and fixed and variable cost analysis.
  
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    FPAR 205H - Writing/Performing The 10-Minute Play


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    “The lunatic, the lover and the poet are of imagination all compact.” Add the playwright and the actor to Shakespeare’s list. In this course, student playwrights mine imagination and experience for characters and plots they then polish on stage. Students write three plays and act in one or more plays in each of two public performances. Through acting exercises, they sharpen their performance skills and find inspiration for plots and characters. “In a minute there is time for decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.” And 10 minutes, lovingly crafted and gamely acted, puts on stage all this “little O, the earth.” Read some of the 10-minute plays students have written at http://accweb.itr.maryville.edu/schwartz/10-minute %20play%20scripts.htm
  
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    FPAR 205H - Writing/Performing The 10-Minute Play


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    “The lunatic, the lover and the poet are of imagination all compact.” Add the playwright and the actor to Shakespeare’s list. In this course, student playwrights mine imagination and experience for characters and plots they then polish on stage. Students write three plays and act in one or more plays in each of two public performances. Through acting exercises, they sharpen their performance skills and find inspiration for plots and characters. “In a minute there is time for decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.” And 10 minutes, lovingly crafted and gamely acted, puts on stage all this “little O, the earth.” Read some of the 10-minute plays students have written at http://accweb.itr.maryville.edu/schwartz/10-minute%20play%20scripts.htm


  
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    FPAR 206H - Cultural Studies of Rock’N’Roll


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course will explore rock andamp; roll’s origins, contexts, images, lyrics, and the music itself. Students will consider how the music creates meaning and what the relationship of rock andamp; roll is to American culture and history.
    Cross-listed: HUM-206H
  
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    FPAR 210 - Performance Workshop I


    Credits: Three (3)
    A course designed for people who desire experience for public presentations and/or performances. Various strategies will be employed including acting, oral interpretation, mime and improvisation.
  
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    FPAR 211 - Performance Workshop II


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course continues the individual and group performance work of FPAR 210.
  
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    FPAR 261 - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: ENGL101
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
    Cross-listed: ENGL 261/361, FPAR 361
  
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    FPAR 261H - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Four
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101; membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
    Cross-listed: ENGL 261H
  
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    FPAR 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Program Director Approval
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    FPAR 361 - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
    Cross-listed: ENGL 261/361, FPAR 261
  
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    FPAR 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Program Director Approval
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    FREN 101 - Elementary French


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces structures of French with emphasis on basic grammar and colloquial language.
  
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    FREN 102 - Elementary French II


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FREN-101
    This course reviews basic grammar and conversation with emphasis on composition, reading and speaking French.
  
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    FRSC 119 - Murder to Trial


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces students to the
    interrelationship between the investigation of a
    crime, the process of forensic evidence and the
    use of that evidence at trial. Students will be
    taken to a mock crime scene where they will learn
    through experience as they collect evidence they
    will process in the lab and conclude with a mock
    trial.
    Cross-listed: CRIM-119
  
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    FRSC 151 - Introduction to Forensic Science


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: CHEM-103
    Corequisite: FRSC-151L

    Introductory course that highlights all aspects of forensics as an umbrella of the work associated in the forensic process. The course will introduce topics such as ethics, observing and obtaining physical evidence, as well as a survey of the techniques and instrumentation (chromatography, spectrophotometry, mass spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, immunoassay techniques, polymerase chain reaction, spatter patterns, digital imaging, document examining, and electronic data collection and storage) used in the analysis of physical evidence (organic and inorganic materials, soil, glass, body fluids, hair, fibers, paint, DNA, bloodstains and patterns, arson evidence, fingerprints, explosive residue, tool marks, documents, and computer and internet evidence).
  
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    FRSC 151L - Required Lab - Frsc 151


    Credits: Zero (0)
    Corequisite: FRSC-151

    Introductory laboratory experience that accompanies Introduction to Forensic Science
  
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    FRSC 211 - Introduction to Criminal Investigations


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a comprehensive approach to the examination and treatment of physical evidence as it relates to the criminal justice system.  Students will be involved in an interactive learning experience tied to the securing and preserving of crime scenes and maintaining the integrity of trace evidence for future court proceedings. 
    Cross-listed: CRIM 211
  
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    FRSC 303 - Forensic Biology


    Credits: Four (4)
    Corequisite: FRSC-303L

    This course covers biological evidence and techniques used in forensic science. Concepts and application of serology and molecular biology techniques to analyze biological evidence collected during criminal investigations, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other RNA/DNA techniques.
  
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    FRSC 303L - Required Lab - Frsc 303


    Credits: Zero (0)
    Corequisite: FRSC-303

    Laboratory experience that accompanies Forensic Biology.
  
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    FRSC 311 - Forensic Chemistry


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: CHEM-204, and CHEM-353
    Corequisite: FRSC-311L

    This course focuses on the analytical and instrumental methods used in the forensic sciences with a particular emphasis on the analysis and characterization of trace evidence, to include separations, mass spectrometry, and atomic/molecular spectroscopy.
  
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    FRSC 311L - Required Lab - Frsc 311


    Credits: Zero (0)
    Corequisite: FRSC-311

    Laboratory experience that accompanies Forensic Chemistry.
  
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    GEOG 101 - World Regional Geography


    Credits: Three (3)
    Using maps, students explore physical geography and its relationship to cultures, governments and economies of the worlds different regions.
    Cross-listed: SCI-101
  
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    GEOG 200H - Myths and Folklore of North America


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors program
    Americans don’t have to worry about Zeus, Apollo and Wotan thundering through the skies The class will study theories and research of personality development in the elderly, factors influencing coping and adjust the Old World. This class explores the different facets of American mythology and folklore, including Native American tales, mythical heroes, historical figures, African influences, cowboys, ghost stories, tall tales and urban legends and discusses what our mythology and folklore tells us about ourselves, our history and the meaning of life.
  
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    GEOG 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    GEOG 301 - Physical Geography


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students are introduced to the earth as a planet with continents, oceans, atmospheres, landforms, climate, vegetation and soils.
    Cross-listed: SCI-301
  
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    HCPM 100 - Introduction to Healthcare Management - Part 1


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course lays the foundation of the healthcare system as it relates to healthcare management. It focuses on the history, evolution, and development of the present American health care system including the role of the various health care providers.
  
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    HCPM 101 - Introduction to Healthcare Management - Part 2


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-100
    This course offers an overview of healthcare practice management principles and functions within ambulatory healthcare settings and organizations. Topics include business operations, care systems, and organizational dynamics and leadership.
  
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    HCPM 109 - Healthcare Terminology


    Credits: Three (3)
    A basic-level medical terminology course for those who plan to be involved or are already involved in the health professions field the course will cover the definition, spelling and pronunciation of medical word roots and combining forms, prefixes, suffixes and medical abbreviations. Healthcare management  business terminology is also addressed in this course.
  
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    HCPM 210 - Professionalism and Communications in the Healthcare Setting


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-100
    A course in professional standards for healthcare  managers. Participants in this course will gain knowledge of how to effectively communicate within healthcare settings. Consideration will be giving to understanding the range of stakeholders in healthcare settings, the impact of social media, how to effectively communicate with patients and families, and the role of communicating for purpose and policy change. Students will develop personal communication skills and gain understanding of the importance of collaborative problem-solving, cultural sensitivity, and the need for continuous learning through presentations, case studies and written assignments.
  
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    HCPM 230 - Human Resource Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Human resources management includes legal, behavioral, and administrative aspects of personnel management. Students will enhance their managerial skills through deeper understanding of recruitment and retention of personnel, training and evaluation practices, compensation and benefit systems, in addition to the impact of legal and regulatory environment.
  
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    HCPM 331 - Healthcare Compliance and Quality


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-211
    This course is an in-depth examination of quality and regulatory compliance issues associated with a healthcare management environment. It offers a broad base of foundational compliance knowledge with real-world solutions, as well as the study and application of regulatory requirements for quality and performance improvement. Topics include an overview of the OIG recommended Compliance Program for Physicians, coding/billing and reimbursement issues, and discussions related to compliance with regulations and statutes, e.g.,OSHA, CLIA, HIPAA Privacy and Security, and other quality-based programs affecting healthcare such as pay-for-performance and RAC programs. Students will explore quality improvement techniques with an emphasis on the roles of patient and health professional in improving healthcare delivery, outcomes tracking, analysis, and impact on practice performance and patient care.
  
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    HCPM 341 - Revenue Cycle Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-109, and HCPM-211
    Revenue cycle management is critical to the success of the medical practice.Practice topics include evolution of the third-party payer system, revenue cycle basics, claims generation and processing, reporting and analysis, valuation of the accounts receivable, collection of accounts, and building an effective revenue cycle team.  In addition, the coding aspects will be discussed as they pertain to effective billing processes and strong practice compliance.  Students will learn how to manage the practice’s revenue cycle and their responsibility to the physician owners.
  
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    HCPM 360 - Software and Technology in Healthcare


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-211
    Course participants will learn about the evolution of software and technology in healthcare practices and learn how to identify what technology is appropriate based on the needs, size, specialty and sophistication of a healthcare practice. They will also gain an understanding of federal mandates, such as “Meaningful Use, PQRS, etc., relate to medical practice technology. A discussion of privacy and security standards as related to HIPAA, including the application of HIPAA requirements as related to practice management software, will be undertaken. Students will learn how to maneuver through the software and technology selection, negotiation and implementation process through case studies and written assignments.
  
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    HCPM 451 - Medical Law and Risk Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Course participants will examine decision making along the legal and ethical dimensions of healthcare management. Course concepts include the current health care environment and the types of practices and licensing and certification of health care professionals; criminal law and torts that are relevant to the health profession, as well as ethical theories, morality, employee and patient rights and responsibilities, consent, legal reporting, professional liability, and end-of-life issues. Additionally, students will explore various risk management strategies, including the development, implementation, and maintenance of policies and procedures to prevent or minimize the impact of adverse events.
  
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    HCPM 455 - Financial Management in Healthcare


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-211, and HCPM 341
    This course applies financial management principles to healthcare management and healthcare systems. Topics will include resource allocation, cost analysis, and funding sources as well as how financial decisions are made, reported, and implemented in healthcare management.
  
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    HCPM 456 - Patient Partnering/Population Health Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-211 and HCPM 331
    Patient partnership and engagement is the key to a successful practice and healthcare system. In this course, students will have the opportunity to examine formal and informal programs and strategies used to make this partnership and engagement enhance the medical practice’s performance, quality care and outcomes, and patient satisfaction.
  
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    HCPM 490 - Healthcare Management Practicum & Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-456
    The Practicum is designed to give students the opportunity to learn about practice management by immersing themselves in the daily activities of a practice management professional. During the practicum, students often observe meetings, work collaboratively on site projects, conduct informational interviews, with the goal of increased understanding of the profession and potential career paths. It requires a minimum of 60 hours at a pre-approved healthcare practice/facility.  Specific assignments during the practicum will be tailored to the opportunities available at the assigned site. The onsite portion is accompanied by classroom discussions focused on personal and professional growth.  
  
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    HCPM 491 - Healthcare Management Capstone


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HCPM-490
    The capstone project is the culmination of the student academic experience. In this course students will examine current healthcare policy and emerging trends. They will be asked to identify one or more current problem, initiative, or issue in healthcare management and analyze that topic from multiple perspectives drawing on knowledge gained throughout the program. The goal of the capstone is to develop a deeper understanding of a topic of importance in healthcare management, to study available options, programs, and relevant research, and to generate and present practical solutions to clients and colleagues.
  
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    HEPR 107 - Foundations of Health Care


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course offers an initial study of individual health with an emphasis on wellness and prevention. The second focus of the course is on the history, evolution, and development of the present American health care system including the role of the various health care providers.
  
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    HEPR 108 - Medical Terminology


    Credits: Three (3)
    A Medical Terminology course for health professionals consisting of information regarding the pronunciation, spelling, definitions of medical terms; an in-depth review of Greek-Latin roots/prefixes/suffixes, medical abbreviations, medical chart review; and supplemental studies of documentation which will enhance the application of the acquired medical terminology in clinical settings.
    Note: Some sections of this course may be offered online.
  
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    HEPR 109 - Healthcare Terminology


    Credits: Three (3)
    A basic-level medical terminology course for those who plan to be involved or are already involved in the health care practice management field. The course will cover the definition, spelling and pronunciation of medical word roots and combining forms, prefixes, suffixes and medical abbreviations. Healthcare practice business terminology is also addressed in this course. This survey course is not recommended for students majoring in the health professions.
  
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    HEPR 150 - Intro to Gerontology


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides a multidisciplinary perspective of the biological, psychological and sociocultural aspects of aging. An overview of the issues that significantly impact the older adult, their family and society is presented. The demographics profile of America’s older adult serves as a basis for explaining issues related to physical and mental health changes, role transitions, care and living arrangements for the older adult.
  
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    HEPR 160 - Services and Programs for Older Adults


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course deals with issues facing the aging population, their families and other caregivers. Information about available programs and resources to meet the psychosocial and health needs will be provided. Topics discussed in class will include housing, nutrition, transportation, socialization, geriatric case management, estate planning and public and veteran’s benefits.
  
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    HEPR 197 - Aging and Physiological Adaptation


    Credits: Three (3)
    Knowledge of normal and abnormal age-related change is essential to professional practice in many disciplines. This course explores the processes of aging, using several theoretical frameworks and practice models to promote understanding of the biophysical and psychosocial domains of the aged person. Strategy and intervention toward health promotion is emphasized.
  
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    HEPR 200 - Alzheimers Patient and Caregiver


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines the effects of Alzheimer’s Disease on the total family functioning. The impact of this disease on the physical, emotional and social health of the caregiver is explored. Caregiver burden is defined and ways of assisting the caregiver are outlined.
  
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    HEPR 204 - Beginning American Sign Language 1


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces the students to American Sign Language, the language used by members of the Deaf community in the United States and Canada. Focuses on dialogues in ASL, basic expressive and receptive skills in ASL, grammar rules. Awareness of deaf culture also is included.
  
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    HEPR 205 - Beginning American Sign Language 2


    Credits: Three (3)
    American Sign Language 2 is a continuation of the basic aspects of American Sign Language (ASL) taught in ASL 1 with an emphasis placed on the progressive development of expressive and receptive skills. Students will focus on mastering fingerspelling, giving directions, numbers, facial expression and sentence structure. Students will also further develop the conversational/cultural behaviors necessary to hold a beginning-level conversation. Along with the focus on language, will be a deeper understanding of Deaf Culture
  
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    HEPR 210 - Issues of Aging


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the social issues associated with aging and their effect on the elderly person. The course will examine the societal and cultural viewpoints which surround the social issues. The course will explore resources available to the older adult as possible solutions to the social issues.
  
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    HEPR 215 - Occupation Performance Disability and Aging


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines how aging affects performance issues. Topics include community mobility, work and retirement, technology, disease, disability, rehabilitation, caregiver issues and role changes.
  
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    HEPR 220 - Introduction to Health Professions


    Credits: 3
    This course is primarily for students planning a career in health care or a health related field.  It will provide an introduction to a variety of health professions, strategies for career planning and include the concepts of professionalism, ethics, interdisciplinary health care, as well as world health issues and health policies.  The course will also include basic health care skills and practices including universal precautions and body mechanics. This course is not meant for the Pre-Med major, but does not exclude the Pre-Med Student from enrollment.
  
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    HEPR 228 - Introduction to Positive Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)

    Positive Psychology is an emerging field that involves the study of satisfaction among workers, policies that result in the strongest civic engagement, and how people’s lives can be most worth living. Positive Psychology focuses on building factors such as resilience, coping skills, protective factors, and strengths so that people may not just face and manage the problems of life but flourish and thrive. This course will involve an exploration of positive emotion, meaning and purpose, positive relationships, and positive accomplishments. Students will also learn about factors that influence levels of happiness, and strategies to increase well-being, life satisfaction, and longevity.

  
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    HEPR 230 - Interdisciplinary Team Care


    Credits: Three (3)
    The older adult population has unique biopsychosocial and spiritual needs related to the process of aging and its developmental stage. Health status often is influenced by income level, living arrangements, and need for physical and psycho/social supports. Focus will be on recognition and respect of variations in care that are inherent in caring for older adults.
  
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    HEPR 250 - Cross Cultural History of Aging


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course will take a comparative approach to a study of ideologies and traditions toward old age in selected cultures around the world. Cultures studies will include: Native American, African, Asian, and European. The last part of the course will look at the evolving history of old age in the United States from the Colonial Period to the present. Some of the issues covered include: elderly in the family and society, changing ideas about old age, history of public policies toward the elderly, gender differences, impact of the growing numbers of elderly on historical and political events.
  
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    HEPR 295 - Psychological Adjustment and the Aging


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course deals with issues of adjustment, psychological coping and psychological disorders in the later part of the life span. The class will study theories and research of personality development in the elderly, factors influencing coping and adjustment. Focus will be on the occurrence, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological and psychiatric disorders in the elderly.
  
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    HEPR 296 - Delerirum, Dementia or Alzheimer’S Disease


    Credits: Three (3)
    The behavioral, affective, cognitive, physiological and causative theories of delirium and dementia are presented. Assessment of individuals with cognitive impairment and interventions for the related disorders are discussed.
  
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    HEPR 298 - Pharmacological and the Elderly


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course focus is pharmacological therapies prescribed for common illnesses in the aged, with regard to complex drug regimes, polypharmacy, potential for drug-drug interruptions, side effects, and drug metabolism in the elderly. In the course, health promotion and disease prevention behaviors are discussed in relation to physiological changes associated with aging and disease states.
  
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    HEPR 299 - Exercise and Rehabilitation In The Aged


    Credits: Three (3)
    This seminar course discusses the issues and concerns about exercising and rehabilitation programs in aged population. Topics discussed in class include: effect of exercise on the older adult, physiological characteristics of the elderly, precautions for the aged, starting an exercise program, and rehabilitation concerns for the older adult.
  
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    HEPR 300 - Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the theoretical and conceptual aspects of cultural healthcare. Topics include culture and ethnicity, cultural variations in response to actual or potential problems of health and illness; review of research literature; and methods of caring for and treat individuals with culturally influenced responses.
  
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    HEPR 305 - Independent Study In Gerontology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students interested in independent study for the Gerontology Certificate Program need to Contact the Gerontology Certificate Coordinator in the School of Health Professions.
  
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    HEPR 310 - History of Health Care


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the history of a health profession from its earliest beginnings to the present. The development of the profession from a social and cultural aspect is emphasized.
  
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    HEPR 314 - Chinese Medicine


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will explore the history, principles, practices, use and outcomes of traditional Chinese medicine. It provides an overview of the field and focuses on specific traditional Chinese medicine practices and how they are utilized in alternative, complementary and integrative healing. Cultural, ethical, legal and professional issues will be explored.
    Observations and interviews of traditional Chinese medicine practitioners will be utilized.
  
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    HEPR 332 - Awareness Through Movement


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the principals of movement
    developed by Moshe Feldenkrais. It utilizes his
    book, Awareness Through Movement and his ideas of
    precisely directed attention during gentle easy
    movement to develop the sense of self that allows
    for improved action in the surrounding
    environment.
  
  •  

    HEPR 333 - Movement Techniques for Health Care Providers


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will explore specific movement techniques that are useful in the practice of Music Therapy and other health professions, including Laban Movement Analysis, Hatha Yoga, and Pilates. Students will gain physical confidence and technical skills while learning to adapt movement techniques to serve a variety of client populations.
  
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    HEPR 334 - Movement Techniques for Health Care Providers II


    Credits: Two (2)
    This course examines physical, philosophical, psychological and spiritual disciplines that are based on the premise that the mind and the body must be developed together in order to achieve optimal health and happiness. Students will use their own lives as laboratories for applying these techniques and reaping the benefits. Students will learn how to utilize these disciplines to achieve self-awareness, personal goals, and professional success.
  
  •  

    HEPR 350 - Counseling for Health Care Professionals


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is an introduction to more effective ways to communicate, skills/techniques of counseling and the dynamics of the professional/client relationship. Where possible, application is made to the health profession setting.
  
  •  

    HEPR 370 - Fitness, Wellness And Nutrition


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CHEM-104, and BIOL-394
    This course will provide a thorough introduction, discovery, analysis, and integration of the normal components of exercise, fitness, nutrition, and wellness throughout the lifespan. Bioenergetics, neuromuscular and metabolic response and adaptations to exercise, environmental influences, and training optimization will be addressed.
  
  •  

    HEPR 400 - Health Care Ethics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HEPR-107
    This course provides an overview of the discipline of ethics in the healthcare context. Ethical theories and approaches are studied, followed by an exploration of general bioethics issues. The course then proceeds into a more specific focus on ethical issues that will face the individual health care practitioner. The goal of this course is to provide the basic ethical tools necessary for recognizing ethical issues and working toward the resolution of ethical problems.
    Self-awareness tools, case studies, and exams and assignments that emphasize analysis and application will be used to facilitate the development of the ethical dimension of the students growth as competent and caring health care professionals.
  
  •  

    HEPR 420 - Clinical Epidemiology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HEPR-108
    This course introduces the student to epidemiological methods: the study of disease occurrences in the human populations, making predictions about individual patients regarding diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, and to the application of epidemiological data in clinical patient care. A core component of the course will be using four different recurrent models to emphasize epidemiological methods and ideas
  
  •  

    HEPR 430 - Genetics for Health Care Professionals


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: BIOL-102, CHEM-104, and MATH-125
    An interprofessional course for students in the health professions. Students will study transmission genetics, DNA and chromosomes, population genetics, genetics of immunity and cancer and ethical aspects of genetic counseling.
  
  •  

    HEPR 440 - Health Care Systems


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: HEPR-107, and HEPR-400
    This course is designed to integrate information about health care systems and the delivery of health care in the United States. Future trends, historical development, political, economic, scientific, educational, and social factors in health care will be assimilated. Information pertaining to ideas, beliefs, customs, and practices concerned with ensuring health, as well as preventing and curing illness and diseases will be presented. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and Disablement models will be integrated throughout this course. As a capstone course, information presented in health care systems will be synthesized, evaluated, and experienced through a service learning project.
  
  •  

    HEPR 460 - Public Health


    Credits: Three (3)
    An introduction to public health practice in the United States, this course examines the formal structures and institutions of public health, and prominent public health problems.
  
  •  

    HEPR 496 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    HIST 103 - America and Contemp World


    Credits: Three (3)
    History of the United States and the world since 1945.
    Cross-listed: HIST-303, PSCI-103, PSCI-303
  
  •  

    HIST 105 - Topics: American Cultural History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys major events, and ideas and issues in American cultural history.
    Cross-listed: HIST-305, HUM-105, HUM-305
  
  •  

    HIST 110 - Women in American History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the impact of historical events on the lives of American women and, in turn, the many roles women played in shaping American history. Topics include native American womens lives; gender and family life under slavery; the impact of industrialization on women of different classes; the ideology of separate spheres; womens political activities including the anti-slavery movement, the suffrage movement, the 19th Amendment, and the resurgence of feminism in the 1960s; and transformations in the lives of modern women including work, politics, sexuality, consumption patterns, and leisure activities.
    Cross-listed: HIST-310, WS-110, WS-310
  
  •  

    HIST 115 - History of American Indians


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores topics in American Indian History.
    Cross-listed: HIST-315
  
  •  

    HIST 116 - St Louis History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will examine the major political events and social conditions influencing the lives of the people of St. Louis from its earliest inhabitants to the present, but with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Classes will consist of a mixture of discussion and lecture, with students invited to participate fully with questions, comments and ideas.
    Cross-listed: HIST-316
  
  •  

    HIST 119 - Film and American History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores films for their ability to recreate, reveal, change, or influence U.S. history. Students will view many films in and out of class and learn to analyze them as historical documents. The main focus of how historians explore, analyze, and make meaning from this area of historical evidence: films. 
    Cross-listed: HIST-319
  
  •  

    HIST 121 - U.S. History to 1877


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course covers the discovery and colonization of North America, the American Revolution, the Constitution, Federalists and Republicans, Jacksonian Democracy, Sectionalism and Civil War, and Southern Reconstruction.
    Cross-listed: HIST-321
  
  •  

    HIST 122 - U.S. History since 1877


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies 19th Century industrialization, the labor movement, imperialism, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, and the Cold War.
    Cross-listed: HIST-322
  
  •  

    HIST 125 - Topics Environmental Hist


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies human environmental interactions over time, focusing especially on the impact of agriculture, industry, and urbanization on both the natural world and the humanized landscape.  A fundamental premise of environmental history is that nature is an active participant in human affairs, not just a passive stage for human activity. 
    Cross-listed: HIST-325
  
  •  

    HIST 128 - The American West


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the history of the trans- Mississippi West of the United States, including Native American history and cultures, European and Anglo-American frontiers, the expansion of the United States in the 19th century, and the interaction of Native Americans, European-Americans, Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans.
    Cross-listed: HIST-328
  
  •  

    HIST 131 - World History I: To 1500


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores significant people, movements, events, and ideas in the major civilizations of the world to about 1500.
    Cross-listed: HIST-331
  
  •  

    HIST 132 - World History II: 1500-Present


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores significant people, movements, events and ideas in the major civilizations of the world from 1500 to the present.
    Cross-listed: HIST-332
  
  •  

    HIST 172 - History Governments of East Asia


    Credits: Three
    This course is a historical study of Japan, Korea, Thailand and the countries of East Asia excluding China. For China,
    Cross-listed: HIST/PSCI 372
  
  •  

    HIST 200 - Intro to Historical Resrch and Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    What do historians do? How do they work? Why do they work the way that they do? In this course we will explore the intellectual skills that historians use to do their work. These skills are of use not only for professional historians but for many other areas you may pursue in life. Some of the skills we will practice include: using libraries, finding aids and information technology; presenting research orally and in writing; reading critically, thinking analytically and writing persuasively; learning various approaches to the study and interpretation of history; discovering the attitudes and values shared by most historians; and developing an understanding of the ethical considerations in historical scholarship.
 

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