2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
    Jul 17, 2024  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


Undergraduate Prerequisites Course Numbering
A “C-” or higher is required in all prerequisite courses 100-299 - Lower division undergraduate
  300-499 - Upper division undergraduate
  500-699 - Graduate
Search Tip 700-799 - Doctoral
Use the asterisk (*) key as a wild card.
Example: Select “Prefix” NURS and enter 6* in the “Code or Number” field to return all Nursing courses at the 600 level.

 

 
  
  • PSYC 105 - Introduction to Leadership


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the nature of leadership from a multidisciplinary perspective. Emphasis is placed on helping students gain a better understanding of what makes for good leadership. Students will study classic and contemporary leadership theories, and then explore options to develop their personal leadership potential.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-105
  
  • PSYC 202H - Psyc Honors: Thinking Like a Social Scientist


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This seminar course introduces students to the research methods and principles of psychological science. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and understanding the scientific methods used in the social sciences.
    Note: This course fulfills the requirement of PSYC 101.
  
  • PSYC 210 - Careers in Social Science


    Credits: One
    This course provides students with career information within the broad field of the social sciences (psychology, sociology, organizational leadership, etc).  Students will develop a career plan by being given guidance on how to research occupations, apply to graduate programs and internships, create personal statements, develop a resume, and find jobs using their chosen degree within the social sciences.  
    Cross-listed: SOC 210
  
  • PSYC 228 - Introduction to Positive Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Positive Psychology is an emerging field that involves the study of satisfaction among workers, policies that result in the strongest civic engagement, and how people’s lives can be most worth living. Positive Psychology focuses on building factors such as resilience, coping skills, protective factors, and strengths so that people may not just face and manage the problems of life but flourish and thrive. This course will involve an exploration of positive emotion, meaning and purpose, positive relationships, and positive accomplishments. Students will also learn about factors that influence levels of happiness, and strategies to increase well-being, life satisfaction, and longevity.
    Cross-listed: HEPR-228
  
  • PSYC 240 - Critical Thinking in Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-101F or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores the importance of scientific critical thinking and ethics as they relate to advancing scientific knowledge, understanding, and application of knowledge in the Social Sciences. Students will develop a firm theoretical and scientific background related to scientific critical thinking and values in the Social Sciences to become critical thinkers within their disciplines.
  
  • PSYC 254 - Human Development through the Lifespan


    Credits: Three (3)
    A knowledge of normal growth and development is essential to professional practice in many disciplines. This course explores the process of human development, particularly in Western cultures. A holistic life-span approach is used to promote an understanding of the biophysical, cognitive, affective, social, and spiritual functioning of healthy individuals.
  
  • PSYC 260 - Crisis Intrvention


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is an essential foundation for people who anticipate or are presently working with individuals in crisis situations such as suicide, rape, spouse abuse, death and addictions. The course focuses on theory and practical application of crisis intervention techniques.
  
  • PSYC 296 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  • PSYC 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
  • PSYC 310 - Psychology of Stress and Health


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course examines the interaction of biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors in promoting health and preventing illness. You will learn an overview of psychological research methods, theories, and principles for stress management that can be applied to enhance approaches for promoting health. Topics include but are not limited to factors underlying health habits and lifestyles, methods to enhance health behavior and prevent illness, and stress management.
  
  • PSYC 311 - Child Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores child development from birth through late childhood. Topics span biological, cognitive, language, social, emotional, and moral development. The interaction of nature and nurture (genes and environment) is emphasized, including the effects of different social and cultural contexts on children’s development, and implications for parenting decisions and educational practices.
  
  • PSYC 314 - Adolescent Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores development during adolescence. Topics span biological, cognitive, language, social, emotional, and moral development. The interaction of nature and nurture (genes and environment) is emphasized, including the effects of different social and cultural contexts on adolescent development, and implications for parenting decisions and educational practices.
  
  • PSYC 320 - Personality


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores major personality theories including Freudian, neo-Freudian, behaviorism, humanism, and contemporary theories of personality as well as empirically based applications.
  
  • PSYC 321 - Abnormal Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course covers the domains of psychopathology as it is represented in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Students will examine the nature, course, symptoms, consequences, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Current empirically-based treatments and evidenced-based practices will be reviewed.
  
  • PSYC 322 - Child Abnormal Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course covers the domains of child psychopathology as it is represented in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Students will examine the nature, course, symptoms, consequences, and treatment of abnormal behavior in children. Current empirically-based treatments and evidenced-based practices for specific treatment of children will be reviewed.
    Note: A course in developmental psychology or abnormal psychology is the prerequisite for this course.
  
  • PSYC 325 - Social Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Social psychology is the scientific study of how people think about, influence, relate to one another, and ultimately create meaning. It involves understanding how people affect, and are affected by, others around them. This course introduces you to the theory, empirical findings, and research methods of social psychology. You will develop the ability to analyze social situations that you encounter in your everyday lives through the application of theory and methods in social psychology.
    Cross-listed: SOC-325
  
  • PSYC 326 - Criminal Behavior


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, SOC-202H, PSYC-101, PSYC-202H or CRIM-102
    The purpose of this course is to understand the dynamics of criminal behavior. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the course will explore the major socialiological, criminological, and psychological theories attempting to explain criminal activity. 

     
    Cross-listed: CRIM/SOC 326

  
  • PSYC 328 - Mental Illness and Society


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course addresses mental illness and its impact on various institutions of society.The definitions and symptoms of mental illnesses will be presented.The focus will be on how mental illness impacts societal institutions, including criminal justice, occupational, educational, and others.Particular emphasis is placed on problems and limitations in the mental health system and how society is adversely affected by those problems.The course objective is to learn a realistic appraisal of mental illnesses and effective philosophies and methodologies to begin correcting problems related to mental illness in society.
    Cross-listed: SOC-328
  
  • PSYC 330 - Human Sexuality


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course surveys the social, biological, and psychological aspects of human sexual behavior. Scientific research related to sexual anatomy, arousal, gender, and life span sexual behavior will be explored. Topics may also include but are not limited to sexual orientation, cultural variations in attraction and love, and sexual morality.
    Cross-listed: SOC-330
  
  • PSYC 340 - Social Aspects of the Aged


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or SOC-101
    This course examines the problems and issues relevant to America’s elderly population, focusing on financial concerns, public policy, health and institutionalization.
    Cross-listed: SOC-340
  
  • PSYC 351 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-101F, or PSYC-202H
    This course explores the discipline of industrial and organizational psychology, the scientific study of psychology applied to work. Topics include but are not limited to selection, recruitment, psychological assessment, performance management, learning and development, organization assessment, organization attitudes and behavior, and workplace psychological health.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-351
  
  • PSYC 352 - Counseling


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course presents an overview of the major counseling theories and techniques. Particular emphasis is placed on the key concepts of each theory, the role of the therapist/clinician, therapeutic goals, and the principal techniques that follow from each theory. Cultural, legal, and ethical issues facing counselors are addressed as well as strategies for employing basic counseling skills.
  
  • PSYC 355 - Personnel Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-101F, PSYC-202H, Minimum grade C-
    This course examines the application of psychological research and theory to effective human resource management in organizations. Particular emphasis is given to recruitment, selection, performance management, learning and development, and the social and legal context of personnel psychology.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-355
  
  • PSYC 358 - Psychological Tests and Measurement


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or PSYC-202H and PSYC/SOC/CRIM-341; Minimum grade C-
    This course explores the application of principles underlying the theory, interpretation, and administration of psychological tests, including tests of intelligence, achievement, personality, and ability. Students will learn how theories, principles, and concepts are applied in educational, clinical, and employment settings, and will compute and interpret basic psychometric statistics.
  
  • PSYC 365 - Multicultural Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is intended to introduce and familiarize students with the concept of multicultural psychology. The course will address issues of human diversity theory and research that are emphasized by the American Psychological Association, including age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, language, and SES. The course will also encompass issues related to identity, oppression, bias, acculturation, and workplace diversity, as well as research methodologies utilized to promote greater understanding.
  
  • PSYC 370 - Forensic Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course will provide students with information on the various activities and roles forensic psychologists and other mental health professionals play both in the field of psychology and the legal system. The course covers forensic topics including: serial killers, sex offenders, terrorism, the insanity defense, the etiology of aggression, and the treatment of offenders reintegrating into society post offense. Additional topics may include: violence risk threat assessment, child abuse/neglect, polygraph examinations, mental health law, and false confessions.
  
  • PSYC 374 - Social Conflict and Negotiation


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H or SOC 101 or SOC 202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course will explore social science theory and practice as it relates to social conflict and negotiation in a variety of situations. Students will gain an understanding of the theoretical frameworks for social conflict and negotiation, and learn to apply theory to not only minimize the dysfunctions of conflict but also facilitate the constructive functions of conflict in their everyday lives.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-374; SOC 374
  
  • PSYC 385 - Evolutionary Psychology


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: PSYC 101
    This course explores how biological evolution relates to human psychology. Students will learn how evolutionary principles apply to psychological theory and research, covering topics that include romantic relationships, family relationships (including parenting and sibling dynamics), friendship and cooperation, judgment and decision making, clinical pathology, and religious belief.
  
  • PSYC 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-

    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptons at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.

  
  • PSYC 401 - History and Systems of Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course will explore major theoretical systems of psychology. Emphasis will be on Philosophy and science backgrounds of psychology and integration of recent trends. Development of theories and causes of events in academic and applied psychology will also be explored.
  
  • PSYC 420 - Psychology of Women


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course provides an opportunity to apply critical thinking and principles of feminist psychology to evaluating psychological theories and research in the areas of psychological development and functioning of women.
    Cross-listed: WS-420
  
  • PSYC 421 - Psychology of Learning


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course focuses on the theoretical and applied perspectives of learning. Students will explore theories and applications of Pavlovian and operant conditioning, observational learning, and social cognitive theory.
  
  • PSYC 425 - Organizational Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 202H

    Organizational psychology is the scientific study of how and why people think, feel, and behave as they do in organizations. Building on research in social psychology, it applies psychological science principles and theories to work settings (organizations) for the purpose of improving the well-being and effectiveness of employees and the organization.  This seminar course includes topics such as perception and learning in organizations; attitudes; job satisfaction; justice, diversity and inclusion; stress and health; conflict; individual differences and personality; motivation; decision making; teams; power and influence; organization culture and change. 

     
    Cross-listed: Cross-listed: ORGL-425

  
  • PSYC 431 - Substance Abuse


    Credits: Three (3)
    The purpose of this course is to explore the impact of drug use and/or abuse on the lives of people and to assist students in gaining a realistic perspective of substance use related to problems in society. The course accentuates the impact of addictive substances on the body.


    Cross-listed: REHB-431

  
  • PSYC 435 - Human Cognition


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course covers the fundamentals of human cognition including processes such as perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, and decision-making. The course will begin with a general discussion of cognition and its neural bases. The course will be divided into three sections: a) cognitive neuroscience, perception, and attention, b) theories of memory and knowledge representation, c) language, problem solving, and decision-making.
  
  • PSYC 440 - Sensation and Perception


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is an introduction to sensation and perception. Each of the major sensory systems will be covered focusing on anatomy, physiology, and the neural responses stimuli produce. We will also focus on perception and how we ultimately make sense out of raw stimuli such as light, sound, or pressure waves.
  
  • PSYC 441 - Advanced Applied Statistics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-341, SOC-341, or CRIM-341; Minimum grade C-
    This course builds upon material introduced in PSYC/SOC/CRIM 341, Understanding Statistical Inference. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered in this course, as are multivariate methods. In most research, multiple variables are examined simultaneously. The overall goal is to become proficient using SPSS to conduct various analyses and accurately interpret both the data and the results.
  
  • PSYC 451 - Biological Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course surveys the connection between biological systems and human behavior. Topics range from sleep and dreams to drugs, stress and health, memory, emotion, and psychological disorders. Primary attention is given to different parts of the brain, neurotransmitters, hormones, etc. Emphasis is given to the interaction of nature and nurture, neural flexibility (neuroplasticity), and prospects for individual change.
  
  • PSYC 454 - Cognitive Development


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Cognitive development is an upper division elective for psychology majors examining the course of biological, psychological and social emotional development in humans. The course will focus on early development and the systems of attachment, memory, emotions and states of mind. Development will be discussed in terms of the implications of early relationships on the developing mind.
  
  • PSYC 460 - Sport and Exercise Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    The field of Sport and Exercise Psychology is primarily concerned with the study of psychological factors and skills that impact sport performance and exercise participation. The psychological foundations of physical activity, the mental aspects of sports, the theoretical basis of mental training processes and competition, and basic issues in performance psychology are reviewed.
  
  • PSYC 461 - Applied Sport Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Applied Sport Psychology involves the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and the practice of mental skills, reflection on one’s own mental skills, critique of mental skills assessment and mental skills utility, and the preliminary development of a performance enhancement program. This course examines the psychological foundations of physical activity, the mental aspects of sports, the theoretical basis of mental training processes and competition, and basic issues in performance psychology. Psychological tools as they apply to coaching effectiveness and exercise psychology will also be examined.
  
  • PSYC 472 - Understanding Organizational Behavior


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Organizational behavior is the scientific study of how people think, feel, and behave in and around organizations. It is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates knowledge from psychology, sociology, and organizational sciences. The purpose of this course is to examine the foundational theories in organizational behavior and their application for the purpose of improving organization effectiveness and individual well-being.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-472, SOC-472
  
  • PSYC 473 - Group Dynamics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course focuses on the scientific study of sociological and psychological processes in groups. We will explore the theoretical explanations for group processes and the practical application of theory into groups. Topics include but are not limited to theoretical perspectives in group dynamics, group formation and development, structure of groups, group processes, and team effectiveness.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-473, SOC-473
  
  • PSYC 475 - Psychology of Trauma


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This psychology of trauma course explores the nature and dynamics of trauma and healing and the range of posttraumatic reactions. Particular focus is placed on understanding the difficulties people face in response to life-threatening situations (e.g., abuse, natural disaster, genocide, war, human trafficking).
  
  • PSYC 477 - Police Psychology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or PSYC 202H; and CRIM 102
    This course explores psychological principles as applied to aspects of police officer’s career. Some of the topics to be examined are: the unique psychological stresses of police work, the effects of that stress on both the officer and his or her family; identification and management of the problem police officer; psychology of crowds; riots and their effective control; and the application of psychological principles to detective work. The interpersonal dynamics of the police with civilian complainants, victims, and violent, aggressive individuals will also be covered
    Cross-listed: CRIM-477
  
  • PSYC 478 - Drugs and Addiction


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or PSYC 202H; and CRIM 102
    This course examines substance abuse and addiction through the lenses of psychology and criminal justice, examining both why individuals abuse drugs and the role of this activity in criminal behavior. The psychological and biological theories explaining drug abuse and addition will be covered. We will also examine the impacts of drug abuse and addiction on crime
    Cross-listed: CRIM-478
  
  • PSYC 490 - Social Service in St. Louis


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is designed to give students an introduction to the vast network of social service agencies and community mental health providers in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area. The course includes site visits to various agencies and discussions with representative social service practitioners from programs in chemical and drug dependency, community corrections and crime prevention, crisis intervention, domestic violence, mental health, and other human service areas.
    Cross-listed: SOC-490
  
  • PSYC 491 - Organization Consulting


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides students with applied experience in organization assessment and consulting. Student consultants will apply concepts and methods to assess a real client organization in order to help them improve effectiveness. You will develop foundational knowledge on collecting, analyzing, and feeding back assessment information to the client. The course will help you build your resume while providing pro-bono services to a non-profit organization.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-491
  
  • PSYC 492 - Organization Consulting Interventions


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides students with applied experience in the design and delivery of leadership and organization effectiveness interventions. The focus of the course is on designing, implementing, and evaluating an intervention with a real client organization. As an undergraduate student, you will develop foundational knowledge on designing and evaluating empirically supported interventions. The course will help you build your resume while providing pro-bono services to a non-profit organization.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-492
  
  • PSYC 495 - Practicum


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    ; Junior Status

    This course is designed as a culminating experience to integrate theory and practice in the context of an approved field-based experience under the supervision of the course instructor. Practicum requires completion of 150 clock hours on site along with coursework relevant to the student’s field experience.
    Note: This course gives students an opportunity for career exploration, community involvement and on-the-job experience before graduation.
    Cross-listed: SOC-495, ORGL-495
  
  • PSYC 496 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Junior- or senior-level students may design and conduct an independent study project in a field of their interest under the direction of a faculty adviser.
  
  • PSYC 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, or PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptons at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
  • REHB 105 - Perspectives of Disability


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will explore the various introductory perspectives of disability; the individual perspective, society at large, the family perspective, sexuality and disability, educational system perspectives, and legal and ethical issues. The course will explore how these perspectives can drive public policy and service delivery systems. Students will gain knowledge and a foundational understanding of the history of rehabilitation as well as the philosophy. This course will also provide the student with working knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act Title I, II, andamp; III.
  
  • REHB 220 - Medical Aspects of Disability


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will gain an understanding of the complexities related to living with disability. The course addresses changing needs in recovery, independence and rehabilitation of people with disabilities. Course focus will provide students with knowledge and skill sets to implement individual program plans.
  
  • REHB 230 - Communication and Helping Skills


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will gain knowledge and skills to become effective communicators in the helping professions, learning how to communicate across diverse disabilities. This course provides knowledge, acquisition and implementation of helping skills required in the social service agency environment. Skills taught include; documentation, note writing, staffing, crisis intervention and skill integration.
  
  • REHB 340 - Employment And Disability


    Credits: Three (3)
    The purpose of this course is to convey the history, impact and strategies of Vocationa Rehabilitation and Supported Employment for persons with disabilities. Job site behavior management at the job types of supported employment and special affecting successful employment of persons disabilities will be addressed. Students gain knowledge of the Vocational Rehabilitation System and employment of people
    with disabilities who utilize Vocational Rehabilitation Services. Students will gain an understanding of client status within the VR System as well as the emphasis on employment and the diverse approaches to work. Included are Ergonomics and Work-Site Accommodations.
  
  • REHB 431 - Substance Abuse


    Credits: Three (3)
    The purpose of this course is to explore the impact of drug use and/or abuse on the lives of people and to assist students in gaining a realistic perspective of substance use related to problems in society. The course accentuates the impact of addictive substances on the body.
  
  • REHB 560 - Working with Children and Adolescents


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will involve an exploration of various issues facing children and adolescents and the implications for rehabilitation counselors. Students will be introduced to multiple perspectives for working with children and adolescents within the contexts of individual, family, and group therapy. Topics include: child and adolescent development, assessment, current directions in research, psychiatric diagnosis, psychotropic medication, approaches to intervention and therapy, and working with multiple providers and larger systems. Students will also examine their assumptions about children, adolescents, and families and how those assumptions impact therapeutic processes and practices.
  
  • REHB 561 - Foundations of Rehab Counseling


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course acquaints the student with the legislative, historical and philosophical roots of rehabilitation counseling in America. Topics covered include federal and local mandates for rehabilitation of individuals with disability, progress of the profession in rehabilitation towards these mandates, the basic principles of counseling and the varied services, as well as organizational structures, available to assist individuals with disability. The course will introduce the student to the professional expectations, values and ethical standards of the profession of rehabilitation counseling.
  
  • REHB 563 - Counseling and Personality Theory


    Credits: Three (3)
    An overview of counseling theories with focus on related theories of personality development, this course will examine the following theories: psychodynamic, developmental, person-centered, behavioral, rational-emotive, cognitive-behavioral, reality therapy, gestalt, transactional analysis and existential.
  
  • REHB 564 - Medical Aspects of Rehabilitation


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course increases the students knowledge of the medical and functional implications of disabilities. Curricular components include neurological impairments, orthopedic disabilities, sensory disabilities, chronic illness, surgical and medical conditions, and other physical disabilities. Attention will be given to the diagnostic and prognostic judgments in assessing the individuals functional strengths.
  
  • REHB 565 - Culture/Psychological Aspects of Disability


    Credits: Three (3)
    An overview of systems theory and family dynamics, multicultural perspectives, developmental stages and psychosocial aspects is presented. Particular attention is given to how these factors influence perceptions and reactions to disability.
  
  • REHB 566 - Issues in Counseling


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will explore a host of issues for which clients attend counseling. Major issues of focus will include but are not limited to chemical dependency, trauma, violence, child abuse and neglect, and loss and grief. Students will learn how these issues affect client well-being, interpersonal relationships, and social role functioning. This course will also provide students with methods of assessment and intervention to assist clients with adjustment to life circumstances, to positive change, and promote health and happiness.
  
  • REHB 567 - Case and Disability Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines the skills necessary to become effective in case management. Case finding, caseload management, service coordination, case referral, consumer advocacy, managed care, cost containment and ethical decision making are among topics discussed. Also reviewed is disability management including accessibility and accommodation issues for a safe workplace, and health promotion through education and consultation.
  
  • REHB 568 - Psychiatric Rehabilitation


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will involve the study of the impact of significant mental health disorders on the individual, family, and society. Particular emphasis will be placed on the individual experience of psychiatric disability and factors that facilitate role functioning and recovery. Students will develop a working knowledge of diagnostic nomenclature and criteria based upon the current classification system of psychiatric disorders (the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision - DSM-IV-TR). This will involve an examination of the genetic, biochemical, psychosocial, and developmental issues related to psychopathology. The course focuses on rehabilitation interventions in collaboration with clinical treatment and peer support.
  
  • REHB 570 - Substance Abuse Assessment and Treat


    Credits: Three (3)
    This comprehensive course involves an exploration of the major components of substance abuse assessment and treatment. Areas of focus will include: screening and assessment, intake, treatment planning, case management, individual, group, and family therapy, and relapse prevention. Students will learn about the contexts through which substance abuse services are provided and various theoretical frameworks, perspectives, and the implications for clinical practice.
  
  • REHB 600 - Counseling Skills and Practicum


    Credits: Three (3)
    Counseling Skills and Practicum must be taken within the first year of coursework.
    Note: REHB 600 must be completed with a 3.0 or better to continue in the program. Failure to meet the grade point expectation will require meeting with faculty advisor to determine program status. Termination from the program may result from unsuccessful completion of the practicum. Successful completion of REHB 600 is required to register for further Rehabilitation Counseling coursework.
  
  • REHB 601 - Internship and Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: REHB600
    Students work for an average of 20 hours per week for the full semester in a rehabilitation agency or community setting and attend a weekly seminar to discuss experiences and develop effective rehabilitation counseling interventions. Students will be required to do readings in professional journals related to their internship experiences. The students agency experience must be primarily in the provision of direct counseling services to individuals, couples or families. In the classroom seminar, through the lectures, discussions, video/audio taping and role-playing, the students will develop further their clinical skills.
    Note: The internship must be supervised by an appropriate supervisor for an average of two hours per week in a one-to-one session.
  
  • REHB 602 - Advanced Internship and Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: REHB-601
    Students will continue with a second semester internship of 20 hours per week on average for the full semester in the same rehabilitation agency as required for REHB 601. The primary focus of this internship experience is in the provision of direct counseling services. The student will also attend a weekly seminar structured as described in REHB 601. The intent of this course is to develop clinical rehabilitation counseling skills for a more skillful approach to effectively help the individual with disabilities.
    Note: Continuation of professional journal readings will be expected.
  
  • REHB 604 - Research Methods and Rehab


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is designed to give students an understanding of basic concepts in research, including research design, variables, measurement, hypothesis testing, and validity. The focus of the course is on conceptual rather than computational aspects of research. The student will learn how to design outcome studies and critically analyze the applicability of research to practice. Strategies that promote research utilization are emphasized throughout the course.
    Note: An undergraduate level course in statistics is a prerequisite for this course.
  
  • REHB 605 - The Individual, Family and Rehbilitation


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides an understanding of individual and family life style, communication patterns, family dynamics, systems theory, and interventions for appropriate use with individuals and families. Focus is given to understanding specialized skills for working with individuals and families of disability and to appreciate the critical issues related to the rehabilitation process. An overview of family therapy theories is presented to add to the knowledge of family dynamics.
  
  • REHB 610 - Family Studies and Issues


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course involves investigation and discussion of major issues currently experienced by families. This advanced course will focus on the implications of these issues on family therapy and intervention approaches. Students will also explore their personal lenses and how they affect services. In addition, students will concentrate on advocacy and the implementation of the course objectives outside of the classroom.
  
  • REHB 611 - Issues in Substance Abuse


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will address major issues and trends associated with substance abuse and addiction. Students will study the impact of substance abuse as it relates to individuals, families, groups, communities, and society. Specific areas of concentration will include: the historical development of substance abuse, costs (i.e., personal, familial, societal, economic, etc.), etiological perspectives, considerations with various populations (e.g., people with disabilities, GLBT, etc.), societal trends and responses, concepts of drug regulation, prevention, and education, and social policy. This course will contribute to students’ awareness of substance abuse as a major issue in rehabilitation counseling.
  
  • REHB 615 - Couples Therapy and Enrichment


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will involve an exploration of theoretical approaches to couples therapy and enrichment. Students will learn the theoretical foundations, processes, and practices associated with these models. In addition, students will explore methods of prevention, education, and enrichment, research findings, major issues that impact relationships, and ethical considerations.
  
  • REHB 662 - Evaluation and Assessment


    Credits: Three (3)
    An examination of the methods of evaluation of the individual is provided including an overview of standardized tests, personality instruments, interest inventories, the use of observation, interviews, rating scales and situational assessments. Cultural difference sensitivity is developed for all evaluation methods. This course discusses the need for a comprehensive assessment of the individual to identify the capacity for rehabilitation.
  
  • REHB 663 - Career Development, Work, and Disability


    Credits: Three (3)
    Career development theories are reviewed with discussion of the implications for vocational evaluation. The student will analyze jobs which exist in the labor market, analyze vocational evaluation work samples and other data, identify appropriate testing instruments and do a labor market survey. This course discusses state-of-the-art practices, such as computerized vocational instruments.
  
  • REHB 664 - Applied Theory and Multiculturalism


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will provide an opportunity to examine personal and theoretical worldviews with an emphasis on the importance of transferring theory into practice. Paralleling the emphasis on the application of theory will be the analysis and evaluation of the multicultural competencies (a. awareness of own assumptions, values, andamp; biases; b. understanding the worldview of culturally different clients; andamp; c. developing appropriate intervention strategies andamp; techniques). In addition, research, ethical concerns, and a disability perspective will be interwoven throughout the course to highlight its connection to theory and multiculturalism.
  
  • REHB 665 - Job Development and Placement


    Credits: Three (3)
    This gives students exposure to the principles of job development, placement and supported employment. Students learn to apply the techniques of job seeking and keeping; job club, job analysis, transferable skills analysis, integration analysis, systematic instruction, reasonable accommodation and supported employment to working with people with severe disabilities.
  
  • REHB 666 - Group Process


    Credits: Three (3)
    The dynamics of group interaction are examined from both theoretical and practical perspectives with particular emphasis on group counseling with individuals with disabilities. Topics addressed include types of groups; marriage and family concerns, leadership styles, counselor roles and models of problem resolution. The student acquires practical experience as both a member and leader of the groups.
  
  • REHB 670 - Foundations of Family Therapy


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will introduce students to the field of family therapy. In addition to learning about its history and development, students will explore the philosophical and theoretical foundations upon which family systems therapy is built. Students will be introduced to the modernist (classic) models of family therapy including the concepts and methods associated with those frameworks to the principles of job development, placement and supported employment.
  
  • REHB 675 - Advanced Family Theory and Therapy


    Credits: Three (3)
    This advanced course addresses current and emerging theoretical frameworks, perspectives, and issues in the field of marriage and family therapy. Students will be introduced to postmodern and constructivist approaches including associated processes and practices. In addition, students will explore special topics related to working with families. These include but are not limited to: child abuse, domestic violence, substance abuse, employment, disability and children and adolescents. This course also involves an exploration of students’ personal philosophies and the relationship of beliefs and assumptions to clinical practice.
  
  • REL 208 - Intro to Sacred Texts


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces students to sacred texts of the world’s religions.
  
  • REL 209H - Religious Issues in Literature


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    Students will examine and respond to literature from various cultural perspectives in order to understand and appreciate the role of religious issues in that literature, particularly the relationship between religion and cultural identity, cultural conflict, tradition, and questions about faith.
  
  • REL 211 - Jesus In The Gospels I


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies the portrayal of Jesus given by the first two evangelists, Matthew and Mark.
  
  • REL 212 - Jesus In The Gospels II


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies the portrayal of Jesus given by the evangelists Luke and John.
  
  • REL 243 - Religious Issues in Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101
    This course studies religious issues as treated in literature.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-243, ENGL-343
  
  • REL 265 - Comparative Religion and Culture


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course introduces the basic beliefs and
    practices of the major religious cultures of the
    world. By comparing these beliefs with their own,
    students better understand their own beliefs and
    practices and become aware of how people of other
    cultures think and act religiously. Students
    develop a tolerance and an appreciation for other
    cultures and a basis for fuller international
    awareness and understanding. See HUM/REL 465
    Cross-listed: HUM-265, HUM-465, REL-265, REL-465
  
  • REL 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
  • REL 301 - Religion, Death and Dying


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course addresses human suffering and dying. Is suffering destructive or creative, and what transformations make the difference? This course addresses the topic from a multicultural perspective.
  
  • REL 326 - Psychology of Religious Experience


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course investigates the experiences of those who claim to find God and examines the relation or non-relation between psychological maturity and deep Christian spirituality.
  
  • REL 328 - Women in Sacred Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides an in-depth study of the historical roots and societal context of women’s religious experience in the traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. By using the Hebrew scriptures, the Christian New Testament, and the Islamic Koran, students explore the major contributions women have made and are making in humanity’s ongoing effort to understand and interpret faith.
    Cross-listed: HUM-328, WS-328
  
  • REL 340 - The Bible and Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101
    A study of some of the most important literary forms and pas- sages from the Hebrew and Christian Bibles, exploring how these texts have influenced imaginative literature in the English, American, and Continental literary traditions.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-340
  
  • REL 343 - Religious Issues in Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies religious issues as treated in literature.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-243, ENGL-343, REL-243
  
  • REL 346 - The Bible, Literature and the Arts


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides an opportunity for students to explore Biblical themes, not only in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures but also in vernacular literatures, art, and music.
    Cross-listed: HUM-346
  
  • REL 350 - Judaism, Christianity and the Holocaust


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on relations between Jews and Christians before, during, and after the Holocaust. The causes of the Holocaust will be studied in detail. The lessons of the Holocaust will also be emphasized.
    Cross-listed: HUM-350
  
  • REL 365 - American Religious Experience


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course studies many expressions of religion in American culture. Students consider the impact of the American experience on religion, the role of religion in the American experience, the religion and state controversies, and contemporary religions.
  
  • REL 375 - Religions in St. Louis


    Credits: Three (3)
    This class introduces students to the wide variety of religious faiths practiced in St. Louis. Field trips will be taken to several houses of worship, where students will have an opportunity to meet religious leaders. Also, guest lecturers from various faith traditions speak to the class.
    Cross-listed: HUM-375
  
  • REL 421 - Survey of the Christian Tradition


    Credits: Three (3)
    A look at how the community founded by Jesus Christ evolved into the churches of today.
  
  • REL 434 - Contemporary Theologians


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course explores the thought of such contemporary religious thinkers as Bultmann, Barth, Tillich, Bonhoeffer, Rahner, Congar, Teilhard de Chardin, and Harvey Cox.
  
  • REL 465 - Comparative Religion and Culture


    Credits: Three (3)
    The course introduces the basic beliefs and practices of the major religious cultures of the world. By comparing these beliefs with their own, students better understand their own beliefs and practices and become aware of how people of other cultures think and act religiously. Students develop a tolerance and an appreciation for other cultures and a basis for fuller international awareness and understanding.
    Cross-listed: HUM-465
 

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