2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
    Jan 24, 2022  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


Undergraduate Prerequisites Course Numbering
A “C-” or higher is required in all prerequisite courses 100-299 - Lower division undergraduate
  300-499 - Upper division undergraduate
  500-699 - Graduate
Search Tip 700-799 - Doctoral
Use the asterisk (*) key as a wild card.
Example: Select “Prefix” NURS and enter 6* in the “Code or Number” field to return all Nursing courses at the 600 level.

 

 
  
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    CMM 605 - Digital Media Campaigns


    Credits: Three (3)
    Designing and creating innovative digital media campaigns is a powerful process in contemporary society and an essential tool for helping organizations craft a public narrative about their value in society. In this course, students will learn to evaluate organizational digital media efforts, create and design digital media campaigns for a variety of purposes, and provide recommendations to organizations about how to improve their digital media efforts. Additionally, students in this course will be able to articulate, find, and digest the latest academic research that lies at the intersection of how technology is impacting organizations.
  
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    CMSD 100 - Introduction to Communication Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will introduce normal speech, language, and hearing development, developmental disorders, and acquired disorders of speech and language in children and adults. Theories of etiology and examples of traditional intervention strategies are introduced for each disorder addressed. In addition, the potential impact of speech or language impairment on the social, emotional, and vocational aspects of a person’s lifespan is a focus.
  
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    CMSD 210 - Phonetics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-100 or concurrent with CMSD 100
    Phonetics is designed to introduce students to the study of speech sounds, with an emphasis on American English. Participants will learn how American English speech sounds are produced and how to transcribe using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Both broad and narrow transcription will be addressed.  The clinical processes for articulation and phonological disorders will be discussed. Characteristics of regional and social dialects will be addressed. This course is required for CMSD majors.
  
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    CMSD 220 - Speech and Hearing Science


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-210
    This course will address the science behind assessment and treatment in the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology. Participants will apply the basic concepts underlying the production and analysis of speech sounds to clinical practice. This course is required for CMSD majors.
  
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    CMSD 310 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 102
    This course will address anatomy, neuroanatomy, and physiology of the human speech mechanism. Course content includes upper body skeletal, muscular, respiratory, and nervous systems. The focus of the speech mechanism in relation to respiration, phonation, resonation, and articulation will be examined in depth as it relates to the field of communication sciences and disorders. This course is required for CMSD majors.
  
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    CMSD 315 - Clinical Observation 1


    Credits: One (1)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-350 and CMSD-360
    Corequisite: CMSD 410, Clinical component health requirements apply

    Students will observe and complete assignments relating to service delivery in the field of communication sciences and disorders. A minimum of 12 hours will be direct observation. Course content will emphasize assessment practices, professional code of ethics, skills in reflective decision-making, and technical writing. This course is required for CMSD majors. 
  
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    CMSD 320 - Clinical Observation 2


    Credits: One (1)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-315
    Students will observe and complete assignments relating to service delivery in the field of communication sciences and disorders. A minimum of 12 hours will be direct observation. Course content will emphasize assessment practices, professional code of ethics, skills in reflective decision-making, and technical writing. This course is required for CMSD majors. 
  
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    CMSD 330 - Nature and Foundations of Language


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-210
    This course is designed to provide an overview of typical American English language development, including major American dialects. Child language is placed in the context of social, motor, and cognitive development from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on the crucial relationship between language development and literacy acquisition. Participants use basic language observation and analysis techniques to explore phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics and pragmatics. This course is required for CMSD majors.  
  
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    CMSD 350 - Speech Development and Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-210, CMSD 310
    This course will provide participants with a scientific understanding of the nature of phonological and articulatory disorders. Assessment and treatment of speech sound disorders will be addressed to help participants apply this knowledge to clinical situations.  The course will provide participants with the knowledge of the normal aspects of articulatory and phonological development and theories of phonological development.  Identification of articulation and phonological disorders, how to interpret assessment findings, intervention approaches and facilitative strategies will be included as they relate to clinical practice. This course is required for CMSD majors.
  
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    CMSD 360 - Language Development and Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-330
    This course addresses the differentiation between normal language development and disordered language. Disorders in the areas of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics will be discussed. Participants will apply theoretical principles of language development to the assessment and treatment of language disorders. The connection between language and literacy including the role of the speech-language pathologist will be discussed. This course is required for CMSD majors. 
  
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    CMSD 410 - Clinical Methods and Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-315, CMSD-320, CMSD-350, CMSD-360
    This course will address assessment and treatment principles, methods and procedures relating to speech, language and hearing disorders. This course is required for CMSD majors. 
  
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    CMSD 440 - Audiology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-310, CMSD-220
    This course will address the anatomy and physiology of the human ear and the process of hearing. The basic principles of hearing assessment and characteristics of hearing disorders across the lifespan will be discussed. Participants will develop familiarity with the procedures and instrumentation used to measure human hearing and speech perception. This course is required for CMSD majors.
  
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    CMSD 470 - Aural Rehabilitation


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-440
    This course will introduce approaches to assisting persons with hearing impairment to maximize their communication interactions. Strategies such as speech-reading, speech auditory training, characteristics of Deaf culture and current issues in hearing impairment intervention will also be discussed. This course is required for CMSD majors. 
  
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    CMSD 480 - Neurological Basis of Communication Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Corequisite: CMSD-310

    Study of the nervous system and its role in normal and abnormal speech and language processing. This course is required for CMSD majors.
  
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    CMSD 485 - Advanced Speech Pathology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-410
    A study of professional terminology, classification, etiologies, symptomologies, and appropriate therapy procedures used with individuals having specific communication disorders.  The course is required for CMSD majors.
  
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    CMSD 490 - Capstone / Clinic Experience in Communication Disorders 1


    Credits: Two
    Prerequisite: CMSD-100, CMSD-210, CMSD-220, CMSD-310, CMSD-315,CMSD-320, CMSD-330, CMSD-350, CMSD-360,
    (exceptions would be post baccalaureate)

    Students will participate in a practicum experience assisting graduate clinicians with fully licensed clinical supervisor(s) consistent with the requirements for becoming a Speech-Language Pathology Assistant (SLP-A) in the State of Missouri. Student clinicians will learn how to apply treatment procedures, meet documentation requirements, and integrate knowledge and skills in speech pathology in the clinic setting. Support will be provided for graduate school applications and preparation. Evidence-based practice will be emphasized, and students may have the opportunity to participate in designing and implementing clinical research projects. This course is required for CMSD majors. 
  
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    CMSD 495 - Capstone /Clinic Experience in Communication Disorders 2


    Credits: Two (2)
    Prerequisite: CMSD-100, CMSD-210, CMSD-220, CMSD-310, CMSD-315, CMSD-320, CMSD-330, CMSD-350, CMSD-360,
    (exceptions would be post baccalaureate)

    Students will participate in a practicum experience assisting graduate clinicians with fully licensed clinical supervisor(s) consistent with the requirements for becoming a Speech-Language Pathology Assistant (SLP-A) in the State of Missouri. Student clinicians will learn how to apply treatment procedures, meet documentation requirements, and integrate knowledge and skills in speech pathology in the clinic setting. Support will be provided for graduate school applications and preparation. Evidence-based practice will be emphasized, and students may have the opportunity to participate in designing and implementing clinical research projects. This course is required for CMSD majors. 
  
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    COMM 121 - Introduction to Contemporary Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a survey of communication from interpersonal to mass media, with an emphasis on understanding the current environment created by communication and technology.Assignments help students understand the media influence in their own lives regardless of major as well as explore communication as a career.
  
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    COMM 141 - Introduction to Media Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students learn and practice the basics of writing for contemporary media and communication in print, electronic, and digital environments. This practical, hands-on course also emphasizes the real-world applicability of the different types of writing to media jobs and communication careers.
  
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    COMM 181 - Pawprint: Digital Writing


    Credits: One (1) to Three (3)
    Students participate in on-campus media, including the online Pawprint news site, as reporters, editors, advertising sales representatives, and promotions coordinators.Opportunities are also available to work with podcasting and video production.Students select their work from a number of activities, including writing and reporting, editing, digital photography, and graphic illustrations.
    Note: This course is open to all Maryville students, who may participate for as many semesters as they wish, but cannot be repeated for credit
    Cross-listed: COMM-281, COMM-381
  
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    COMM 201H - Communication Honors


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    Current topics in communication will vary each semester.
  
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    COMM 203H - Third Places in Communication


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    In contrast to one’s home (first places) and work (second places), third places, which are public places on neutral ground where people can gather and interact, allow people to develop a strong community and enjoy the company and conversation around them (Oldenburg, 1991). Oldenburg (1991) suggests that baseball fields, beer gardens, main streets, pubs, cafes, coffeehouses, and other third places are the heart of a community’s social vitality and the foundation of a functioning democracy. In this course, students will practice the art of qualitative methods such as participant observation and ethnography as they tour, spend time in, and study the rich collection of third places that make up the St. Louis culture. Students will each select a location in the St. Louis area to study and assignments will include written essays and documents developed from primary data collection using qualitative methods. Field trips to 2-3 student-selected third places will be part of this course. The primary idea driving this course is the question of how language, shared meaning, and community are enacted in third places compared to other spaces in a society.
  
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    COMM 208H - Technology And Society


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    Is technology making our lives better or harming us in irreparable ways? What are the ways that technology has made our workplaces better? In what ways has it made us feel more overwhelmed than ever at work? How can we incorporate technology into our lives in measured, healthy ways? In this class, we will explore the latest writings about technology from many great contemporaries writing about its role in our life. We will have several formal and informal debates where we will take opposing views and flush out the arguments that seek to answer some of the biggest questions of our time.
  
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    COMM 219 - Principles of Visual Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores how visual images are used and manipulated to generate responses by various audiences. The written assignments, readings, and discussions will focus on the analysis and critique of visual communication, as well as how to create meaningful visual messages for mass audiences. Students will also study the role and the function of visual media in a variety of environments. This course will cover aesthetic aspects of both print-based and electronic media production.
  
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    COMM 223 - Professional and Organizational Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course has two objectives: (1) to help students understand organizations’ cultures and structures as places of employment and work; and (2) to give students guidance in developing their resumes and portfolios, and mapping out their individual job searching and interviewing networks and strategies. Students will develop their own resumes and portfolios in the class.
  
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    COMM 231 - Introduction to Digital Media


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students are introduced to the computer as a tool for producing digital media and imagery. Students will gain basic software skills to produce illustrations, edit photographs, and create documents. They will learn the basics about three programs: Photoshop, Indesign and Illustrator; as well as basic design principles.

  
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    COMM 232 - Introduction to New and Social Media


    Credits: Three (3)
    This class explores what is new about the new media landscape and why we should care about these changes in the media landscape. Starting with social implications of the new media, the course will delve into how the new media landscape influences aspects of public relations, advertising, and journalism. New and social media are transforming communication for individuals, organizations, and society and this course focuses on the way language, discourses, and meaning have been and continue to be created and altered within the interdisciplinary area of social media. Students will become familiar with many current social media tools during the course of the class and they will also learn to think critically about how individuals and organizations talk about and create meanings within the world of new and social media.
  
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    COMM 241 - News Writing and Editing


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on reporting and news writing for print, broadcast, and online media, including newspaper, radio, television, and the Internet. Students will learn the basics of writing, rewriting, editing, and proofreading news copy, as well as how to identify and write for different audiences.
  
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    COMM 250 - Strategic Comm in Leadership


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course concentrates on public relations theories, strategies, and tactics to meet organizational goals. Some areascovered include media relations, campaign development, social and new media, persuasion, and crisis communication. Students will be able to describe how these elements can be combined to create seamless programs that positively and ethically affect an organization. Students investigate issues that challenge contemporary organizations by analyzing case studies, conducting research, designing possible creative solutions, and gaining hands-on opportunities.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-250
  
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    COMM 251 - Principles of Strategic Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-121

    This course concentrates on the principles, evolution, functions, and applied theories of public relations, including the social, ethical, and legal issues that impact the public relations function.The strategic practice of public relations in different contexts and environments, from corporate to non-profit, is discussed, as are careers in the profession.

  
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    COMM 281 - Pawprint: Digital Writing


    Credits: One (1) to Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-181
    Students participate in on-campus media, including the online Pawprint news site, as reporters, editors, advertising sales representatives, and promotions coordinators.Opportunities are also available to work withpodcasting and video production.Students select their work from a number of activities, including writing and reporting, editing, digital photography, and graphic illustrations.
    Note: This course is open to all Maryville students who may participate for as many semesters as they wish, but cannot be repeated for credit.
    Cross-listed: COMM-181, COMM-381
  
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    COMM 296 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Independant study courses are developed with the professor and requries Program Director’s approval.
  
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    COMM 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Three (3)
    This topics course is offered periodically based on student demand, interest, and needs.The course content is developed by the individual course instructor and is based on topics of special interest to communication majors. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptons at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    COMM 310 - DIGITAL FILM MAKING


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-231 or ADGD-265
    Students will pursue understanding of the language of film, storytelling, and the principles of shooting and editing through the utilization of digital video production software and equipment. Course will include technical instruction covering camera and lighting equipment, editing software, and digital distribution.
    Cross-listed: ADIN-310
  
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    COMM 321 - Communication Research Methods


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-121
    Students in this course will understand and evaluate basic quantitative and qualitative research approaches common to different kinds of communication practice, including research used in strategic communication, applied media projects, and contemporary journalism.Common topics include learning how to conduct and evaluate formal and informal research from surveys, focus groups, and content analysis.
  
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    COMM 322 - Communication Law and Ethics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-121
    This course will cover contemporary communication issues that apply to journalism, public relations, advertising, and broadcasting. Topics include copyright andamp; privacy law, media ownership rules andamp; regulations,libel andamp; privacy issues, news and national security, and use of the Freedom of Information Act.Throughout the course, ethical issues are considered, as well as the “why” of the law.
  
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    COMM 324 - Women in Media


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the changing ways women and the women’s movement have been depicted by the media over the years. Special focus is placed on the media’s treatment of women as consumers, employees, and advertising targets. The course also examines the vital roles that women have played in the development and popularization of newspapers, magazines, film, radio, and television. Lectures, discussions, readings, research, videotapes, movies, and guest appearances by women currently working in media are part of the course content.
    Cross-listed: WS-324
  
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    COMM 327 - Social Media Campaigns


    Credits: Three (3)
    Designing and creating innovative social media campaigns is a powerful process in contemporary society and an essential tool for helping organizations craft a public narrative about their value in society. In this course, students will learn to evaluate organizational social media efforts, create and design social media campaigns for a variety of purposes, and provide recommendations to organizations about how to improve their social media efforts. Additionally, students in this course will be able to articulate, find, and digest the latest academic research that lies at the intersection of how technology is impacting organizations.
  
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    COMM 342 - Advanced Media Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-141
    This course concentrates on advanced reporting, writing, and editing skills for a variety of journalism environments from traditional to online applications.Special attention is given to interviewing techniques and in-depth background research.
  
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    COMM 344 - E-Media and Digital Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-141
    Students will learn how to develop, create, write, and evaluate messages for online and digital channels and environments from traditional web sites to social media applications.Students will also learn to determine the most effective mix of digital and media messages for different audiences and situations.


  
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    COMM 345 - Critical Approaches to Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-121
    This class explores the foundational concepts in the field of communication, with a specific focus on the history, theories, and models that have and continue to guide the discipline. Additionally, this course focuses on broader philosophical concepts that communication students must be exposed to for a strong and solid education.
  
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    COMM 347 - Strategic Communication: Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-141
    Students will learn the basics of developing and writing persuasive and creative messages as part of achieving an organization’s strategic communication goals and objectives. Emphasis is placed on using research to develop strategic platforms for message production, evaluating message writing and message effectivness in achieving communication goals and objectives.
  
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    COMM 363 - Strategic Communication: Research and Strategy


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-251
    This course focuses on developing research-based strategy and tactics that form the basis of an organization’s internal and external communication to create new campaigns or solve organizational problems.Course topics include understanding the best practice models and case studies and how to manage communication situations.The course provides opportunities to develop strategy for a class client.
  
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    COMM 381 - Pawprint: Digital Writing


    Credits: One (1) to Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-281
    A continuation of COMM 281. Students participate in on-campus media, including the online Pawprint news site, as reporters, editors, advertising sales representatives, and promotions coordinators.Opportunities are also available to work with podcasting and video production.Students select their work from a number of activities, including writing and reporting, editing, digital photography, and graphic illustrations.
    Note: This course is open to all Maryville students who have completed COMM 281.
  
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    COMM 390 - Web Design I


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-121
    This course focuses on the technical and aesthetic considerations for designing web sites using HTML, CSS and Flash Animation. Usability, basic graphical user interface design, navigation, production of web graphics, web aesthetics and web 2.0 technologies such as blogs and wikis will be topics of discussion.
    Cross-listed: ISYS 390
  
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    COMM 395 - Model United Nations


    Credits: Three (3)

    This course consists of a study of the politics and constitutions of selected international organizations. Students will acquire advanced practical training as public speakers and rhetors, and refine their skills in parliamentary procedure, issue advocacy, persuasion, argumentation, and consensus building. Students may repeat the course for credit.
    Cross-listed: PSCI-395

  
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    COMM 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    These courses are offered periodically based on student needs and interests. The courses may focus on skill development, special interest topics, or current events. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    COMM 416 - Issues and Crisis Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-121
    Based in the scholarship of issues and crisis management, this course prepares students to fulfill the vigilant communication role important to dealing with issues in a timely fashion to prevent crises, as well as managing and/or mitigating a crises in its various stages.
  
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    COMM 422 - Global Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-121
    This course focuses on communication systems in world cultures with an emphasis on understanding the social, cultural, political, and economic effects on different systems.Students will also explore intercultural communication and the challenges of communicating in a global environment.
  
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    COMM 423 - Professional and Organizational Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-121
    This course has two objectives: (1) to help students understand organizations’ cultures and structures as places of employment and work; and (2) to give students guidance in developing their resumes and portfolios, and mapping out their individual job searching and interviewing networks and strategies.Students will develop their own resumes and portfolios in the class.
  
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    COMM 471 - Strategic Communication Campaigns


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COMM-347
    This capstone experience course gives students the opportunity to use all of their previous coursework to develop, create, implement, and evaluate a communication campaign for a client/organization.Key elements of this course include the ability to apply theoretical concepts to a real-world situation, to negotiate and advise the client on best courses of action, and to experience how the professional communication world works.
  
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    COMM 494 - Portfolio Defense


    Credits: Zero (0)
    All students completing a communication major are required to complete a portfolio defense in their final Spring semester of enrollment. This portfolio defense will occur on an afternoon towards the end of the semester and students will be required to develop an online portfolio and an electronic portfolio to display on the day of the portfolio defense.
  
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    COMM 496 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Application to, and approval by, the Communication Program Director and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.
  
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    COMM 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director
    These courses are offered periodically based on student needs and interests.The courses may focus on skill development, special interest topics, or current events. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    COMM 498 - Communication Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director
    These courses focus on various cultural, political, economic, technological, sociological, commercial, behavioral, or functional aspects of Communication.
  
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    COMM 499 - Internship


    Credits: One (1) to Six (6)
    Prerequisite: Application to and approval by the Communication Internship Coordinator
    Note: Cannot repeat course for credit
  
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    COMM 501 - Foundations of Leadership


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the process of leadership through the framework of contemporary leadership research and theory.Emphasis is placed on integrating theory and practice through a variety of methods, including student case studies and experiential learning.Drawing on current leadership research and tools, students explore options to practice leadership and affect positive change from any position in an organization, community, or society.
  
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    COMM 502 - Foundations: Theories and Application


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides an intensive examination of a variety of strategic communication theories in public relations, advertising, and marketing communication; the background and perspectives of scholars who developed the strategic communication theories; and the application of these theories in academic and professional work.
    Cross-listed: COMM-402
  
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    COMM 503 - Best Practices: Models and Systems


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on the systems and models of communication practice that have been studied and developed by academics and applied by practitioners in their work. The emphasis in this course is understanding the synergy created when academic knowledge and scholarship are incorporated in strategic decision making as illustrated by case studies and other practical-world analysis.
  
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    COMM 516 - Issues and Crisis Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Based in the scholarship of issues and crisis management, this course prepares students to fulfill an advanced level of crisis communication within an organization. This course discusses at an advanced level thecommunication role important to dealing with issues in a timely fashion to prevent crises, as well as managing and/or mitigating a crisis in all its various stages and across all the various channels (including social media platforms).
  
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    COMM 520 - Evidence Based Research


    Credits: Three (3)
    A core competency of strategic leadership is the ability to gather information, analyze and critically evaluate that information, and then use that information to make important decisions. In this course, students will learn to become effective consumers of research and data, as well learn to use traditional methods of research and analysis, such as surveys, focus groups, field experiments, program evaluations, and descriptive and inferential statistics to evaluate organizations, communication strategies, products, services, processes, and performance.
  
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    COMM 522 - Global Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on the advanced communication systems present in a variety ofcultures with an emphasis on deeply understanding the social, cultural, political, and economic effects on different organizational systems.Students will also explore advanced nonverbal and intercultural communication competencies, and the many strategic challenges of communicating in a global environment.
  
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    COMM 523 - Organizational Communication


    Credits: Three
    This course addresses key communication theories and best practices within the context of work. Graduate students will learn how to assess communicative issues, locate quality evidence, and apply the findings to everyday work situations to develop more effective organizational communication strategies both internally and externally. Furthermore, graduate students will learn effective communication strategies specifically in regards to leadership, change management, decision making, organizational culture, organizational identification, conflict management, and team management.
  
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    COMM 525 - Professional and Organizational Ethics


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines ethical decision making and issues in the organizational context using a framework that is empirically informed and consistent with best practices and regulations. Emphasis is placed on understanding how interpersonal and group relations and values impact individual and corporate responsibility and ethical issues in relation to internal and external stakeholders.
  
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    COMM 547 - Strategic Communication: Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will learn advanced techniques for developing and writing persuasive and creative messages as part of achieving an organization’s strategic communication goals and objectives. Emphasis is placed on using research to develop strategic platforms for message production, evaluating message writing and message effectiveness in achieving communication goals and objectives.
  
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    COMM 563 - Strategic Communication: Research and Strategy


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on developing advanced research-based strategy that together comprisean organization’s internal and external communication to create new campaigns or solve organizational problems with the stakeholders upon whomthe organizationdepends.The emphasis in this course is onunderstanding the best practice and currentmodels for strategy through case studies.Students will have opportunities to develop strategy for a class client.
  
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    COMM 571 - Integrated Marketing Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course gives graduate students the opportunity to be innovative in the development, creation, implementation, and evaluation of an advanced communication campaign for a client/organization in the St. Louis community. Key elements of this course include the ability to apply theoretical, evidence-based concepts and strategies to a particular client situation, to negotiate and advise the client on best courses of action, and to experience the real-world outcomes of evidence-based strategies.
  
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    COMM 580 - Conflict Resolution and Negotiations


    Credits: Three (3)
    In this course, students will learn theoretical models and frameworks to help you better understand the differing types of conflict that can arise within an organization, why conflict arises, when conflict can help versus hurt an organization, and how conflict can be negotiated and resolved. In addition, students will learn specific negotiation and mediation strategies and techniques.
  
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    COMM 597 - Special Topics: Strategic Communication


    Credits: Three (3)

    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptons at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.

  
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    COMM 605 - Digital Media Campaigns


    Credits: Three (3)
    Designing and creating innovative digital media campaigns is a powerful process in contemporary society and an essential tool for helping organizations craft a public narrative about their value in society. In this course, students will learn to evaluate organizational digital media efforts, create and design digital media campaigns for a variety of purposes, and provide recommendations to organizations about how to improve their digital media efforts. Additionally, students in this course will be able to articulate, find, and digest the latest academic research that lies at the intersection of how technology is impacting organizations.
  
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    COMM 610 - DIGITAL MKT METRICS & ANALYTICS


    Credits: Three
    This course provides an intensive examination of a variety of digital media metrics and analytics
    necessary to measure and evaluate marketing communication campaigns.  Furthermore, it
    provides an evidence based approach to digital marketing that can measure an organization’s
    return on their marketing investments.  Graduate students will learn practical, up to date tools
    that will help in analyzing, creating and measuring effective digital marketing campaigns.  
  
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    COMM 630 - Digital Visual Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    The objective of this course is to educate students on how to use and understand photography as a tool in communication. Students will learn how to create professional photographs with their iPad or Digital Camera and grasp an understanding on how to read those photographs from an objective lens. There will be a survey of topics ranging from photojournalism ethics to fashion model objectification that will widen one’s appreciation of how photography changes society for the good and bad. The course will be deep rooted in photography theory and critical thinking. Students will graduate will the basic skills of an entry level photographer and have a portfolio of images to illustrate their competency. The experience will accumulate in a final photo-thesis where the student will argue with media theory (Punctum and Studum Theory) why the images they created are powerful.   
  
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    COMM 673 - Social Network and Search Engine Optimization


    Credits: Three (3)
    Develop knowledge, understanding and concepts related to direct and web marketing techniques,
    tactics and strategies that enable a manager to make sound business decisions. Topics include web
    media and databases, target audiences, forecasting and cost control, research and testing of creative strategies.
  
  •  

    COMM 685 - Capstone: Comprehensive Examination


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director required
    Note: Comprehensive examination must be taken in the last semester of coursework before graduation.
  
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    COMM 697 - Special Topics


    Credits: Three (3)

    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptons at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.

  
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    COMM 698 - Strategic Communication Capstone


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will choose between a thesis and a project.Thesis:Students completing a thesis will identify a topic on which to conduct original research with the goal of adding to the theoretical body of knowledge in strategic communication.Project:Students completing a project will use applied research and theory to construct a comprehensive plan to address a problem/opportunity in a selected setting, such as the student’s place of work or an organization or cause the student is interested in.
  
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    COSC 150 - Intro to Java Programming


    Credits: Three (3)
    This is an introductory to intermediate level hands-on programming course intended primarily for students who have interests in Java programming. WINDOWS-based JBuilder is used.
    Note: No previous programming experience is required.
  
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    COSC 151 - Computer Science I: C++


    Credits: Three (3)
    This is an introduction to computer programming in C/C++ language. The course covers structural programming concepts, simple data types and algorithms in addition to basic C++ syntax, operators, control structures, arrays, pointers, and function parameter passing. Lab assignments are required for coding techniques, program design, and debugging.
    Note: No previous programming experience is required.
  
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    COSC 152 - Computer Science II (C++OOP)


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: COSC-151, Minimum grade C-
    This course covers the concepts of encapsulation and Object Oriented Programming. Topics include the OOP fundamentals such as inheritance, polymorphism, and in addition overloading and exception handling. OOP programming environment in JAVA may be presented at the later part of the course.
    Note: Lab assignments are required at the intermediate level of OOP design.
  
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    CPAR 101 - Roles and Responsibilities of the Community Paramedic


    Credits: Two (2)
    This course will introduce the student to the role and responsibilities of the Community Paramedic. The Community Paramedic’s specific role and responsibilities as a part of the healthcare team and community will be addressed. Interdisciplinary work will be explored and defined as it relates to population-focused care and the Community Paramedic.
  
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    CPAR 120 - Community Assessment


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will introduce the role of the Community Paramedic in community assessment. Effects of social, cultural, ecological, political, and economic factors are studied as they impact families and communities.
  
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    CPAR 200 - Management of Chronic Diseases


    Credits: Four (4)
    This course will describe the care and management of the patient with chronic diseases. Patient assessment, medications, and additional therapies are emphasized in this course. Course content includes the Community Paramedic’s responsibilities for documentation during patient encounters.
  
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    CPAR 220 - Community Paramedic Practicum


    Credits: Three (3)
    Clinical activities are concentrated in the community and encourage students to practice community paramedicine with families and populations.
  
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    CRIM 102 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts and frameworks used in the criminal justice studies. It provides a survey of the various agencies making up the U.S. criminal justice system, primarily the criminal court, law enforcement, and corrections.
  
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    CRIM 119 - MURDER TO TRIAL


    Credits: Four
    This course introduces students to the interrelationship between the investigation of a crime, the process of forensic evidence and the use of that evidence at trial. Students will be taken to a mock crime scene where they will learn through experience as they collect evidence they will process in the lab and conclude with a mock trial.
    Cross-listed: FRSC 119
  
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    CRIM 201 - Police Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines contemporary approaches in police management at the local, state, and federal levels. Attention is paid to the fiscal and personnel management techniques utilized by law enforcement agencies, plus the recruitment and maintenance of officer staffing.
  
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    CRIM 203H - Sexual Violence and Aggression


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    Even though there have been considerable monetary and time resources spent on violent crimes by local, state and federal agencies, law enforcement have had a difficult time prosecuting the sexually violent criminal because of societal views on personal freedoms. This course is a systematic introduction to the causation of violent offending and extreme aggressive behavior and the treatment and incarceration of this type of criminal. The readings and course framework will stress a criminological approach to sexual violence and aggression.
  
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    CRIM 210 - Multicultural Policing


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on the challenges present in policing multicultural settings. Issues pertaining to understanding diverse cultures and effective communication across cultures from the standpoint of law enforcement are explored in detail.
  
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    CRIM 211 - Introduction to Criminal Investigations


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is a comprehensive approach to the examination and treatment of physical evidence as it relates to the criminal justice system. Students will be involved in an interactive learning experience tied to the securing and preserving of crime scenes and maintaining the integrity of trace evidence for future court proceedings.
    Cross-listed: FRSC 211
  
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    CRIM 220 - Corrections in Society


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the evolution of correctional practices in the United States. It also examines and assesses the variety of correctional options utilized within the criminal justice system.
  
  •  

    CRIM 250 - Experiential Policing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: CRIM-102
    This course introduces students to the dynamics of police recruit training. Student are familiarized with a myriad of law enforcement issues such as criminal and traffic law, juvenile justice, report writing, and investigative patrol tactics. In addition, this course introduces students to the physical rigor required for successful acceptance to St. Louis County Municipal Police Academy.
  
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    CRIM 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    CRIM 305 - Family Violence Through the Lifespan


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101 or CRIM-102; Minimum grade C-
    Family Violence across the Lifespan explores the etiology, prevalence, treatment, and prevention of family violence. A broad coverage of viewpoints and theories behind family violence are covered.
    Cross-listed: SOC-305
  
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    CRIM 311 - Criminal Law and Procedure


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will examine substantive criminal law and the elements of specific crimes, including crimes against persons and property. Students also will be introduced to the sources of criminal procedural law and the steps involved in a prosecution. Defenses and immunities to crimes will be discussed also.
  
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    CRIM 321 - Sociology of Deviance


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H
    This course studies the understanding of normative violations within society, specifically, how actions and/or actors come to be defined as deviant and what functions deviance serves in society.
    Cross-listed: SOC-321
  
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    CRIM 322 - Criminological Theory


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, SOC-202H, or CRIM-102
    This course offers an introduction to criminology and a survey of the major theoretical traditions within criminology over the past three centuries.
    Cross-listed: SOC-322
  
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    CRIM 323 - Juvenile Delinquency


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H
    This course surveys the criminal and deviant conduct of youths. Theoretical and treatment patterns are also considered.
    Cross-listed: SOC-323
  
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    CRIM 326 - Criminal Behavior


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, SOC-202H, or CRIM-102
    The purpose of this course is to understand the
    dynamics of criminal behavior. Using a
    multidisciplinary approach, the course will
    explore the major socialiological,
    criminological, and psychological theories
    attempting to explain criminal activity. 

     
    Cross-listed: PSYC/SOC-326

  
  •  

    CRIM 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, SOC-202H, or CRIM-102; Minimum grade C-

    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.

  
  •  

    CRIM 405 - Domestic and International Terrorism


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSCI-110, SOC-101, or SOC-202H
    This course surveys perspectives pertaining to the etiology of terrorism at both the domestic and international level. Study of the various tactics used by identified terrorist groups is explored. In addition, the techniques of counter terrorism are assessed.
    Note: See SOC 405
 

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