2016-2017 Academic Catalog 
    
    Aug 22, 2019  
2016-2017 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


Undergraduate Prerequisites Course Numbering
A “C-” or higher is required in all prerequisite courses 100-299 - Lower division undergraduate
  300-499 - Upper division undergraduate
  500-699 - Graduate
Search Tip 700-799 - Doctoral
Use the asterisk (*) key as a wild card.
Example: Select “Prefix” NURS and enter 6* in the “Code or Number” field to return all Nursing courses at the 600 level.

 

 
  
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    EDUC 617 - Psychology of the Gifted


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on the emotional and social needs of gifted students in grades pK-12 with a focus on the connection between school and affect. Topics engaged in are models of intelligence and gifted identification; asynchronous development; moral development; motivation and self-esteem; highly-creative and highly-gifted individuals; group affiliation, friends, and family; multi-exceptionality; underachievement and perfectionism; underrepresented populations; suicide, self-mutilation, and depression; and diversity and gender issues.
  
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    EDUC 618 - Developmental Stages


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on human development from birth through adulthood with emphasis on theory followed by application to the classroom. Cognitive, social, psychological and physical development are studied in an integrated approach.
  
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    EDUC 619 - Educator as Action Researcher


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students initiate studies of their school and classrooms using methods and concepts from quantitative and qualitative inquiry methods. Course assignments support developing action-research project to be completed studying their own classroom. Students will become familiar with research literature synthesis and critique, ethnography, survey design, and personal bias. Student skills will be further developed through critical friends’ analysis andstudent work sampling.
  
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    EDUC 620 - Gifted Education Programming, Development, and Evaluation


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: EDUC 200
    EDUC 201

    This course focuses on the principles of program design and development for gifted learners.  The planning, administration, and implementation of gifted service are examined. Participants practice program evaluation and policy writing.
  
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    EDUC 626 - Adolescent Developmental Issues


    Credits: Three (3)
    Designed for teachers, counselors, parents or anyone who works with adolescents, this course explores the seemingly contradictory, bizarre and counterproductive behavior of the adolescent child. Through discussions, readings and interaction with adolescents, participants analyze developmental issues and develop strategies of understanding and working to meet the needs of these youngsters.
  
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    EDUC 627 - Survey of Gifted and Talented Education


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: EDUC 200
    EDUC 201

    This course provides participants with the history of gifted education and an overview of gifted education in the U.S. and abroad. Current legal and political trends and issues in gifted education are discussed, along with advocacy and local, state, and national policies.
  
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    EDUC 629 - Creativity, Problem Solving, and Critical Thinking


    Credits: Three (3)
    Models, concepts, and processes in creativity, problem solving, and critical thinking are engaged in with hands-on practice with a focus teaching gifted learners in multiple K-12 formats and subjects. In particular, course participants are introduced to the concept of creativity, characteristics of the creative individual, and school-based applications of creativity across domains.
  
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    EDUC 634 - Clinical Experience with Students Experiencing Reading Difficulties: Elementary


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: EDUC-652, and EDUC-654
    Corequisite: EDUC-635

    The purpose of the clinical experience is to assist graduate candidates in learning the strategies necessary to take on the role of the reading specialist in an elementary setting.  The two major roles of the reading specialist will be emphasized:  a) the role of literacy teacher who can diagnose and remediate the literacy problems of children at elementary levels and b) the role of literacy coach who can lead professional development in literacy at the building level. 
  
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    EDUC 635 - Clinical Experience with Students Experiencing Reading Difficulties: Secondary


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: EDUC-634, EDUC-652, and EDUC-654
    Corequisite: EDUC-634

    The purpose of the clinical experience is to assist graduate candidates in learning the strategies necessary to take on the role of the reading specialist in a secondary setting.  The two major roles of the reading specialist will be emphasized:  a) the role of literacy teacher who can diagnose and remediate the literacy problems of adolescents at secondary levels and b) the role of literacy coach who can lead professional development in literacy at the building level. 
  
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    EDUC 645 - Secondary School in Today’s Society


    Credits: Three (3)
    Corequisite: EDUC-646

    Students will explore the history and current purposes of public secondary schools and the school systems of the United States, focusing upon the diversity and complexity of American society. The place of the schools in the fashioning of an informed citizenry will be examined. A study of the ways in which secondary curriculum, school organization, control and governance of education, and the nature of teaching and learning produce many tensions will be studied in light of the school settings in which students are placed.
  
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    EDUC 646 - Secondary Teaching Strategies


    Credits: Three (3)
    Corequisite: EDUC-645

    Based upon knowledge of the purposes of school and the development of adolescents, students in field placements reflect on methods of teaching, learning and assessment appropriate for various contents and settings. Students will create lessons and units in their content area.
  
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    EDUC 647 - Secondary Internship I


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: EDUC-646
    In conjunction with the coursework in methods of teaching reading and methods of teaching the content areas, students will spend an extended time in a secondary setting teaching lessons, gaining feedback, and improving effectiveness in teaching diverse high school students.
  
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    EDUC 648 - Secondary Internship II


    Credits: Six (6)
    Prerequisite: EDUC-647
    Students engage in a full semesters internship in public school. Every aspect of teaching, assessment and other teaching responsibilities will be implemented. Students will prepare lesson plans, participate in biweekly seminars, reflect through journaling, and complete a student work sampling study.
  
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    EDUC 649 - Secondary Practicum/Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: EDUC-648
    In this course, students will reflect upon and analyze professional teaching experiences encountered throughout their program. The seminar will assist students in assessing their own teaching effectiveness and setting goals for future professional development. The course contents professional issues will focus around the four strands of school and society, teacher development, curriculum and instruction, and research.
  
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    EDUC 650 - Language Acquisition and Development


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will include theory, research, and effective practice for facilitating first and second language acquisition for students K-12. The course will include language acquisition for students with physical, psychological, and cognitive disabilities. The focus will be on interrelationship between language development and the teaching of literacy strategies.
  
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    EDUC 652 - Analysis and Correction of Reading Disabilities


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will learn how to use and interpret informal and norm-referenced assessment instruments with students who have various literacy problems.  Students will learn how to provide appropriate instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, word analysis, vocabulary, spelling, fluency, comprehension, metacognition and writing strategies for struggling readers and writers.
  
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    EDUC 653 - Literature and Literacy


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will focus on the appropriate use of literature in literacy development from early childhood to high school. Special emphasis will be given to the reading/writing connection. Candidates will develop a content-based integrated literature unit of study for a classroom teacher that includes technology.
  
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    EDUC 654 - Collaborative Partnerships for Literacy


    Credits: Three (3)
    One major focal point is the development of coaching skills by the reading specialist in working with school professionals. Special emphasis will be given to counseling with parents that have diverse backgrounds (i.e., ELL). This course will include the interpretation of individual intelligence tests to parents. Candidates will learn how to apply behavior management strategies in the special reading classroom.
  
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    EDUC 655 - Examination of Literacy Programs


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will help candidates deeply explore current and relevant models and methods used to teach reading in elementary and secondary schools.  Examples include literacy programs and methods that have been used to support early literacy, ESL, information literacy, and family literacy.   Candidates will practice training peers in various research-based literacy methods and models.  The candidate will leave this course with the skills needed to compose both individual, and school-wide literacy action plans focused on research-based reading methods that support literacy development, current teaching practices, and the overall effectiveness of literacy programs. 
  
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    EDUC 656 - Behavioral Intervention for Diverse Struggling Readers and Counseling Techniques for their Care Givers


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will help candidates explore behavior interventions that can be used with struggling elementary and secondary readers in the school setting.  Special emphasis will be given on working with struggling readers from diverse backgrounds (race/ethnicity, socioeconomic background, gender, physical and cognitive disabilities, etc.).  Candidates will also develop counseling skills for working with, and supporting, caretakers of struggling readers.
  
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    EDUC 657 - Analysis of Reading Data, Instructional Coaching, and Partnerships with Reading Teachers


    Credits: 3
    In the local area, one of the primary roles of reading specialists, outside of assisting students who have reading difficulties, is often to serve as an instructional coach to assist reading teachers in the continuous improvement of their craft.  Part of this course focuses on the essential skills that instructional coaches need, including building a climate of trust, modeling best practices, observing teachers and facilitating reflective conversations.  Candidates will explore some of the common obstacles faced by instructional coaches and how to overcome such challenges. The candidate will leave this course with a thorough understanding of resources and tools reading specialists may use to facilitate and coach adult learners in the areas of reading curriculum, reading methods, and reading assessment. 

    Student data should drive all instructional decisions that reading specialists make alongside classroom teachers.  As a result, part of this course will also include candidates practicing a deep analysis of student reading data.  The candidate will leave this course with an ability to analyze student data in order to appropriately select various reading methods, instructional strategies and interventions appropriate for a variety of struggling readers.

  
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    EDUC 659 - Psychological-Educational Testing


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces various educational and psychological tests with special emphasis on the evaluation of abilities and achievement of various student populations.  Special emphasis will also include the administration and interpretation of individual intelligence tests. Students will study multiple assessment tools and put some of the most widely-used into field-based practice.  Concepts and models for the identification of various populations of high ability learners are discussed.
  
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    EDUC 660 - Early Childhood Curriculum


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces early childhood curriculum and instructional methods with particular emphasis upon constructivism and developmentally appropriate practices. Course content explores constructivist theory and its relationship and application to developmentally appropriate curriculum and assessment for children with and without disabilities pre-kindergarten through grade three.
  
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    EDUC 661 - Early Childhood Assessment


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students will study the basic concepts of test construction, assessment and the categories of instruments used in screening and diagnosing learning and other aspects of early childhood development for children with and without disabilities. The course prepares students to identify tests and assessment procedures, evaluate them for adequacy and appropriateness and translate the results into developmentally appropriate practice.
  
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    EDUC 662 - Integrated Curriculum


    Credits: Three (3)
    Content-specific learning is not how children have come to an initial understanding of their environment. Learning for the young child involves not only parts, but a constructed whole. Using knowledge of child development, teachers will learn to formulate early childhood curriculum and instruction that is based upon developmental theories of learning.
  
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    EDUC 663 - Early Childhood Internship


    Credits: Three (3) to Six (6)
    Prerequisite: EDUC-666
    Students will engage in supervised experiences with diverse children between the ages of 3 and grade three with and without exceptional learning needs. This internship will provide opportunity for advanced experience in planning, teaching and assessing the growth of children in an early childhood special education setting.
  
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    EDUC 664 - Issues in Early Childhood


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on the problems and issues facing the early childhood professional. Students will identify issues of national concern, identify significant elements of the problem or issues, and strategies which may be used to rectify the concerns, so as to advocate for reasonable change in early childhood practices.
  
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    EDUC 666 - Early Childhood Intervention


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides information and experiences in observing and assessing, implementing and evaluating interventions, and collaboratively implementing a developmentally and individually appropriate support program to promote the development of young children with disabilities, developmental delays or special abilities within an early childhood setting. Students will be introduced to contemporary problems, research and issues that impact early childhood education around working with children with disabilities and their families.
  
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    EDUC 667 - Early Childhood Special Education Process


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students study the sequence of steps of the Special Education Processes that include the selection, administration, and interpretation of formal and informal early childhood special education assessments, the diagnosis and determination of eligibility for services based upon medical, therapeutic, and educational evaluations, and the development of the individual education plan to guide the intervention course of action. Federal and state regulations will be reviewed as a foundation of the Special Education Process. Strategies to support parents and families during this process will also be explored.
  
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    EDUC 668 - Behavior Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is designed to examine classroom organization and behavior management techniques and programs in the early childhood and early childhood special education environment. The overall focus of this course will be on the teacher as the decision-maker in the design and implementation of strategies for the everyday applications of individual and group behavior management programs. Emphasis on functional assessment and positive behavior supports will be addressed.
  
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    EDUC 669 - Communication Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students are introduced to how communication develops and impacts learning from birth through childhood. Communication of Standard English speakers and that of culturally and linguistically diverse populations is investigated. Strategies for facilitating communication in children who exhibit cultural/linguistic diversity and those who exhibit exceptional learning needs are discussed, including augmentative and assistive communication strategies and the importance of family involvement. The need for professionals to develop cultural competence and to participate in life-long learning is emphasized.
  
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    EDUC 674 - Global Awareness Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    This seminar explores global issues including trends in globalization, education, governance structures, ethnic conflict and cooperation, terrorism, human rights, population, health care, refugee/settlement issues, women and family issues, economics/entrepreneurship, and environmental policy. The course will provide information from a multi-cultural perspective to broaden traditional treatments of the issues. Course assignments will focus on outputs relevant to teaching and assessing these issues by emphasizing creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration while using information from media and technology.

  
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    EDUC 675 - Civic Literacy Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)

    This seminar will consider the local and global implications of civic leaders’ decisions resulting from citizens exercising their rights and obligations at local, state, national and global levels. Emphasis will be placed on effective strategies for participating in civic life through knowing how to stay informed and understanding governmental processes. Course assignments will focus on outputs relevant to teaching and emphasizing creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration while using information from media and technology.

  
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    EDUC 676 - Cross-Cultural Practicum


    Credits: Three (3)
    This practicum will provide an opportunity to learn from and work collaboratively with peers representing diverse cultures, religions and lifestyles in a spirit of mutual respect and open dialogue in personal, work and community contexts in an international partnership site. Course assignments will require planning and conduct of a cross-cultural curricular or other education-related activity and a 7-10 day educational exchange to the international partnership site to collect information, demonstrate cross-cultural communication skills and build a foundation for future collaboration.
  
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    EDUC 677 - Global Awareness and Civic Literacy Research Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    This seminar will require the use of research and inquiry models and quantitative and qualitative data analysis in education. Students will apply one or more of these models through an applied investigation of their cross-cultural practicum assignment, present the findings to a relevant authentic audience and will be encouraged to submit for scholarly publication. Course assignments will focus on outputs relevant to teaching and emphasizing creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration while using information from media and technology.
  
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    EDUC 690 - Practicum in Gifted Education


    Credits: Two (2) to Six (6)
    Students supervise children, young adults or, as appropriate, adults. These experiences are arranged on an individual basis in order to complement other aspects of the student’s program. An analytical journal, paper or other mode of evaluation is required.
    Note: Permission of instructor is required.
  
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    EDUC 692 - Practicum in Gifted Education


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: EDUC-617 or EDUC-627; and EDUC-615
    Teachers will participate in a supervised practicum in a state-approved gifted program for children.
    Note: Permission of the instructor is required.
  
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    EDUC 695 - Applied Research


    Credits: Three (3)
    Students review current literature and formulate a design for their masters project.
  
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    EDUC 696 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    EDUC 697 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
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    EDUC 699 - Capstone Experience


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: EDUC-619
    The capstone provides an opportunity for students to synthesize the ideas, experiences and inquiry studies encountered in the masters program. Students finalize their action research project with analysis and consideration of the implications for their future teaching. Students engage faculty and classmates in a 20-30 minute presentation and discussion of their work.
  
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    ENGL 101 - Writing I: The Writing Process


    Credits: Three (3)
    In this course, students engage in the writing process, drafting and revising their compositions. Students develop skills in writing clear, correct sentences and coherent, focused compositions.
  
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    ENGL 104 - Writing II: Research and Argumentative Essays


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course furthers the work of ENGL 101, emphasizing the writing and careful editing of argumentative essays. Students practice techniques to enhance the clarity and persuasiveness of writing for a variety of purposes and audiences. The course includes an introduction to finding and evaluating sources for writing based on research. The major course project is a research paper.
  
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    ENGL 108 - Minority Voices in American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Students develop an appreciation of the literary contributions of minority Americans, primarily of Chinese, African, Puerto Rican, Japanese, Mexican, and Native American heritage.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-308, HUM-108, HUM-308
  
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    ENGL 109 - Survey of American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies major authors and works from the Puritan era to the present.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-309
  
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    ENGL 110 - The American Novel


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies classic and contemporary American novels.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-310
  
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    ENGL 114 - Fairy Tale in Literature And Film


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course will discuss the origin and history of the Central and East European fairy tale. The course reading will include original fairy tales (such as Grimms’ Fairy Tales) and dramatic, fictional, poetic, and cinematic adaptations of representative tales from the tradition.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-314
  
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    ENGL 118 - Literary Forms: Fable to Film


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    The course explains the art of storytelling through an analysis of narrative techniques in fiction, drama and film.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-318, HUM-118, HUM-318
  
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    ENGL 119 - Survey of Women’s Lit


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    A study of the English and American traditions of literature by women. The course focuses on literary analysis and appreciation of fiction, poetry, memoirs, essays, and drama by classical and contemporary authors. The roles of women as authors and as characters will be considered within their historical and literary contexts.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-319, WS-119, WS-319
  
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    ENGL 122 - American Realism and Modernism


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies novels, short fiction, poetry, plays, and essays by various writers of the late 19th and early 20th century. Major authors of this period are read in the context of the historical, cultural, and literary changes of the times; special attention will be devoted to the rise of modernism in American literature. Authors studied may include Kate Chopin, Henry James, Edith Wharton, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Marianne Moore, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Eugene O’Neill, and others.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-322
  
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    ENGL 126 - Latin American Magical Realism


    Credits: Three (3)
    Magical Realism is an interesting and distinctive yet complex genre, combining elements of the fantastic and true-to-life in ways that differ from conventional, English-influenced fantasy stories. While many feature elements of what Americans consider imaginary, at the same time many of the novels are also deeply rooted in the politics and culture of their countries. For many critics, the genre emerged from and is best defined by twentieth-century Latin American writers. This class will examine the conventions and contradictions of this genre, ways in which individual writers employ language and storytelling techniques, and some of the complex relationships between these writers, their novels, their varied countries of origin, and the role of their original languages and translation.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-326
  
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    ENGL 127 - Early American Voices


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course will study major authors and literary movements from the Puritan Era to the end of the Civil War. By analyzing fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays, we will trace the development of an American consciousness and identity from the 17th to the 19th century. Authors will include writers such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Whitman, and Dickinson.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-327
  
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    ENGL 128 - Science Fiction


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Since the first half of the 20th century, Science Fiction has evolved into one of the most vibrant literary forms, especially in the United States and Britain. This class will explore a variety of themes presented in classic and contemporary works of this genre. Readings will range from 19th century writers through the “New Wave” of the 1960s to current writers. Authors may include H.G. Wells, Ray Bradbury, Ursula K. LeGuin, John Varley, Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, and others.”
    Cross-listed: ENGL-328
  
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    ENGL 129 - Writing Fiction


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101
    In this course, we will examine what it takes to craft a successful short story, from inspiration to publication. We will learn some of the basics of good writing, with special attention to plot, form, character, and tone. We will read and respond to one another’s works-in-progress, learning from our collective abilities. We will learn practical strategies for finding inspiration. And along the way, we will expose ourselves to some of contemporary fiction’s most vibrant voices.
    Cross-listed: ENGL 329
  
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    ENGL 150 - Write Short: Fiction, Nonfiction and Poetry


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101
    Some of the most interesting work today in contemporary literature engages short forms. In this course, we will read, discuss, generate and revise creative writing in short form, in poetry, fiction and non-fiction. Readings and writing assignments will revolve around flash fiction and non-fiction, the short poem, Japanese haiku, the uses of aphorism, the uses of short sentences, and genre-blur (is it a prose poem? Flash fiction? Flash creative nonfiction?)
    Cross-listed: ENGl-350
  
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    ENGL 204H - The Art of Persuasive Writing


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101 and Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course develops students’ skills in writing expository and argumentative essays and speeches. Students examine rhetorical traditions in texts ranging from sermons to recent Presidential addresses and write arguments demonstrating their own knowledge of rhetorical strategies. Students support their arguments with peer-reviewed research and develop annotated bibliographies evaluating their sources.
  
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    ENGL 205 - Writing About Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL- 204H; Minimum grade C-
    Students develop skills in analyzing fiction, poetry, and drama.
    Note: This course may count toward the writing minor.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-305
  
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    ENGL 207 - Creative Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104 or ENGL-204H
    A course to develop skills in creative writing, particularly in writing fiction and poetry. Strategies of style, techniques of narrative writing, and forms of poetry are examined.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-307
  
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    ENGL 211 - Rites Of Passage in American Lit


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Students read novels and short stories that focus on the passages from youth to adulthood and from innocence to experience.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-311
  
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    ENGL 212 - Monsters in Film and Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, Minimum grade C-
    This course will look at influential modern works such as Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, recent revisionism by writers such
    as Anne Rice and Octavia Butler, and a few of the many monster movies. Students will consider the language, structure, origins, contexts, and
    implications of the stories.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-412
  
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    ENGL 212H - Monsters in Film and Literature


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course will look at influential modern works such as Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, recent revisionism by writers such as Anne Rice and Octavia Butler, and a few of the many monster movies. Students will consider the language, structure, origins, contexts, and implications of the stories.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-212H, ENGL-412, HUM-212H
  
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    ENGL 213 - Themes in American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Each course focuses upon a major theme in American literature; for example, American Identity.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-313
  
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    ENGL 213H - War and Peace in Literature and Film


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    In this course students will study poetry, drama, fiction, art, and film from throughout the world which address many aspects of war and its repercussions and effects on the family, culture and the larger civilization.
    Cross-listed: HUM-213H
  
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    ENGL 214H - Conspiracy in Literature/Film


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This class will closely examine recent (1968-present) American novels and films in order to understand the conventions and contemporary appeal of the conspiracy narrative. The class will take an interdisciplinary approach: novels may include Thomas Pynchon’s Crying of Lot 49, Ishmael Reed’s Mumbo Jumbo, Margaret Atwood’s Bodily Harm, Don DeLillo’s Libra, Chang-Rae Lee’s Native Speaker, and Chuck Palahniuk’s Fight Club. In addition, films may include The Parallax View, The Manchurian Candidate, The Matrix, The Truman Show, and The Stepford Wives.
    Cross-listed: HUM-214H
  
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    ENGL 215 - Contemporary American Fiction/Non-Fiction


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course analyzes and appreciates selected works of contemporary American fiction and non-fiction.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-315
  
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    ENGL 215H - Tolkien: Medieval and Modern


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    In this course students will explore Tolkien as a medievalist and a modern writer. They will study and discuss The Lord of the Rings, Silmarillion, Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Leaf by Niggle, and On Fairy Stories, as well as the medieval texts Beowulf, the Elder Edda, and the Saga of the Volsungs.
    Cross-listed: HUM-215H
  
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    ENGL 216H - HISTORY OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM


    Credits: Four
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course will consider major documents, works of literature, and works of art that are significant in the development of the idea of religious toleration, liberty, individual conscience, and the modern concept of religious freedom.  The class will discuss the current state of religious freedom in a variety of countries throughout the world and the national and international agencies and institutions that study and monitor its progress or decline.
  
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    ENGL 220H - SECRET DOORS/GOTHIC HORROR


    Credits: Four
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course about the rise of the literary Gothic imagination in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries takes our students on explorations of dusty castles and mansions with secret doors behind every tapestry and a wailing ghost in every attic.  Medieval curses haunt aristocratic families, and vampires seductively charm victims who swoon melodramatically.  Across bizarre literary landscapes, supernaturalism and science often clash, sometimes embrace, in an emerging popular genre for an emerging readership.  Our students will explore the emergence (and continuity) of the Gothic in literature and film.
  
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    ENGL 221 - Shakespeare and his World


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    Students will study in detail the dramatic and literary values of representative comedies, tragedies, histories and romances.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-321, ENGL-221H
  
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    ENGL 221H - Shakespeare and his World


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course will read Shakespeare’s plays as well as the culture of his time in both his home town, Stratford and in London. Students will learn about Shakespeare’s origins, his family, his friends, and his fellow writers and actors in the theater. The course will also study Shakespeare’s language and the material culture of his time with the purpose of developing a Shakespearean exhibit of objects and artifacts showcasing his culture and life. All of this will be done for the celebration of his death in 1616 to be presented on campus during 2016.
  
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    ENGL 222H - The Mystery of Language


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    We speak and write every day, and yet language remains one of the greatest mysteries of our existence. Is it language that distinguishes humans from animals? Is it possible to trace the origins of human language? What is the relationship between speech and silence? Between language and experience? Between words and images? Between original and translation? What are the limits of language? Can we even define what language is? This interdisciplinary course will explore the mythological, philosophical, theological, linguistic, and literary dimensions of these and similar questions. Our readings will span 2500 years of reflections on language, from the Bible and Plato to contemporary inquiries. Along the way, we will encounter philosophers such as Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, and Heidegger, poets such as T.S. Eliot and Emily Dickinson, medieval mystics and modern linguists, and many other writers wrestling with the enigma of language.
  
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    ENGL 223 - New Voices, New Forms in American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This class will examine some of the major authors and literary movements in America after WWII, decade by decade, in order to read them closely, consider their timeliness and timelessness, compare the ways in which literature has maintained and defied previous conventions, and discuss how different kinds of outsiders established their voices. We will likely include short fiction by Flannery O’Connor and Sherman Alexie, novels by Ken Kesey, Toni Morrison, and Don DeLillo, memoir by Maxine Hong Kingston, and drama by Tony Kushner; poetry will likely include the Beats, Confessional poetry, and the Black Arts Movement, with an in-depth look at the work of contemporary poet Sharon Olds.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-323
  
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    ENGL 229H - WONDER WOMEN: FEMINIST SCIENCE FICTION


    Credits: Four
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This class will combine an introduction to feminist theory and practice with an exploration of the various ways science fiction literature represents and reimagines gender roles. Science fiction’s boundless speculative range makes this genre a perfect vehicle for a critique and change of systemic patriarchy. Readings will include classic texts by writers such as Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ursula K. LeGuin, James Tiptree, Jr., Joanna Russ, and Octavia Butler. We will also investigate the emergence of “strong” female protagonists in Young Adult science fiction, and make our own attempts at writing feminist sci fi.
  
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    ENGL 255 - Modern Fantasy Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    The fantastic has been around in literature as early as the medieval and Renaissance periods and even earlier (Beowulf, the King Arthur legends, The Faerie Queene, A Midsummer Night’s Dream). Many people actually believed in trolls, elves and dragons. But why does Fantasy persist, even thrive, in the modern period? How do we define Fantasy as a genre? We will ask such questions as we adventure in the worlds of William Morris, George MacDonald, Lord Dunsany, E. R. Eddison, Robert E. Howard, J. R. R. Tolkien and Stephen R. Donaldson. We will investigate our need for quests, explore the unknown and unusual, and encounter characters that defy the categories of being.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-455
  
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    ENGL 257 - World Literature I: The Dawn of Story


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    This class begins four thousand years ago, with the Epic of Gilgamesh, the first great work of world literature, and then moves through the ancient and medieval world up to the 17th century. Readings may draw from classic works such as The Odyssey, Greek tragedies and comedies, The Aeneid, Beowulf, The Divine Comedy, The Journey to the West, Narrow Road to the Interior, The Canterbury Tales, and Don Quixote. The class may also include writers such as Plato, Aristotle, and Augustine, as well as selections from the Bible, the Koran, and the Bhagavad-Gita.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-357
  
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    ENGL 258 - World Literature II: The Modern Mind


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    Individuality and personal freedom, or alienation and existential despair? This class explores the development of modernity as reflected and developed in the literatures of the world from the 18th century to the present. Readings will be drawn from various global traditions, and may include authors such as Goethe, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Baudelaire, Rilke, Lu Xun, Kafka, Akhmatova, Camus, Abe, and Allende.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-358
  
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    ENGL 261 - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
  
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    ENGL 261H - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Four
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101; Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
    Cross-listed: FPAR 261H
  
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    ENGL 296 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
  
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    ENGL 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum Grade C-
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    ENGL 303 - Reading/Writing Poetry


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    The principal aim of this course is to develop in students a love for the art and craft of poetry. Students read, write, and interpret poetry orally. Elements of prosody are covered and oral performance is stressed.
  
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    ENGL 304 - Grammar, Glamour and Stylistic Choices


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104, or ENGL- 204H; Minimum grade C-
    In this class students examine the many choices they have in developing their own voice and their own style in their writing.Students learn a variety of sentence patterns to make their writing more precise and more powerful.As students gain a comprehensive understanding of grammar, they use that knowledge to choose effective rhetorical patterns for their writing.
  
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    ENGL 305 - Writing About Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Students develop skills in analyzing fiction, poetry, and drama.
    Note: This course may count toward the writing minor.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-205
  
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    ENGL 306 - Advanced Writing Workshop


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104, or ENGL- 204H; Minimum grade C-
    In this course, students develop their skills as professional writers. Topics for essays and articles are chosen from the students major fields of study or areas of interest. The focus is on developing writing skills through a consideration of styles of writing, strategies of argumentation, and resources for research.
  
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    ENGL 307 - Creative Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104 or ENGL-204H
    A course to develop skills in creative writing, particularly in writing fiction and poetry. Strategies of style, techniques of narrative writing, and forms of poetry are examined.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-207
  
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    ENGL 308 - Minority Voices in American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Students develop an appreciation of the literary contributions of minority Americans, primarily of Chinese, African, Puerto Rican, Japanese, Mexican, and Native American heritage.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-108, HUM-108, HUM-308
  
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    ENGL 309 - Survey of American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies major authors and works from the Puritan era to the present.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-109
  
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    ENGL 310 - The American Novel


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies classic and contemporary American novels.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-110
  
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    ENGL 311 - Rites Of Passage in American Lit


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Students read novels, short stories, poems, and essaysthat focus on the passages from youth to adulthood and from innocence to experience.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-211
  
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    ENGL 312 - History of Literary Criticism


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    A study of the development of literary criticism in the western intellectual tradition, the course examines the distinction between criticism concerned primarily with form and criticism concerning itself with evaluation.
    Note: English majors may take this course as a capstone course.
  
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    ENGL 313 - Themes in American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Each course focuses upon a major theme in American literature; for example, “American Identity.”
    Cross-listed: ENGL-213
  
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    ENGL 314 - Fairy Tale in Literature And Film


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course will discuss the origin and history of the Central and East European fairy tale. The course reading will include original fairy tales (such as Grimms’ Fairy Tales) and dramatic, fictional, poetic, and cinematic adaptations of representative tales from the tradition.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-114
  
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    ENGL 315 - Contemporary American Fiction/Non-Fiction


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    This course analyzes and appreciates selected works of contemporary American fiction and non-fiction.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-215
  
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    ENGL 316 - Grendel to Gutenberg: English Literature I


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104, or ENGL- 204H; Minimum grade C-
    A study of major authors and works of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to Shakespeare, this course is required for the English major.
  
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    ENGL 317 - Gulliver To Google: English Literature II


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104, or ENGL- 204H; Minimum grade C-
    A study of major authors and works of English literature from Neoclassicism to the present, this course is required for the English major.
  
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    ENGL 318 - Literary Forms: Fable to Film


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    The course explains the art of storytelling through an analysis of narrative techniques in fiction, drama and film.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-118
  
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    ENGL 319 - Survey of Women’s Lit


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    A study of the English and American traditions of literature by women. The course focuses on literary analysis and appreciation of fiction, poetry, memoirs, essays, and drama by classical and contemporary authors. The roles of women as authors and as characters will be considered within their historical and literary contexts.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-119, WS-119, WS-319
  
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    ENGL 321 - Shakespeare


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    Students will study in detail the dramatic and literary values of representative comedies, tragedies, histories and romances.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-221
  
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    ENGL 322 - American Realism and Modernism


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies novels, short fiction, poetry, plays, and essays by various writers of the late 19th and early 20th century. Major authors of this period are read in the context of the historical, cultural, and literary changes of the times; special attention will be devoted to the rise of modernism in American literature. Authors studied may include Kate Chopin, Henry James, Edith Wharton, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Marianne Moore, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Eugene O’Neill, and others.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-122
  
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    ENGL 323 - New Voices, New Forms in American Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, Minimum grade C-
    This class will examine some of the major authors and literary movements in America after WWII, decade by decade, in order to read them closely, consider their timeliness and timelessness, compare the ways in which literature has maintained and defied previous conventions, and discuss how different kinds of outsiders established their voices. We will likely include short fiction by Flannery O’Connor and Sherman Alexie, novels by Ken Kesey, Toni Morrison, and Don DeLillo, memoir by Maxine Hong Kingston, and drama by Tony Kushner; poetry will likely include the Beats, Confessional poetry, and the Black Arts Movement, with an in-depth look at the work of contemporary poet Sharon Olds.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-223
 

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