2016-2017 Academic Catalog 
    
    Aug 22, 2019  
2016-2017 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


Undergraduate Prerequisites Course Numbering
A “C-” or higher is required in all prerequisite courses 100-299 - Lower division undergraduate
  300-499 - Upper division undergraduate
  500-699 - Graduate
Search Tip 700-799 - Doctoral
Use the asterisk (*) key as a wild card.
Example: Select “Prefix” NURS and enter 6* in the “Code or Number” field to return all Nursing courses at the 600 level.

 

 
  
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    ENGL 325H - Technology, Postmodernism and Literature


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course will examine contemporary attitudes towards technology in post-World War II fiction, film, and critical theory, focusing on various visions of a violent past, an imperiled present, and a dystopic near-future. In doing so, we will consider these and other problems: what is postmodernism, and why does every discussion of postmodernism begin by asking what it could possibly mean? How do our novels embody and challenge aspects of postmodernism? And what comes after postmodernism? What do our novels and films say about technology and teleology? About language, readership, and authorship? About the relationship between the human body and the machine? About humanity’s interconnected hopes and fears? About the power of science so often juxtaposed against the need for, or absence of, spirituality? Authors will likely include Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., J.G. Ballard, Don DeLillo, Joanna Russ, Kathy Acker, William Gibson, and Chuck Palahniuk; please note that several of our novels contain potentially offensive content. We will also likely use Star Wars and Blade Runner, taken together, as a case study in postmodern, technology-centered film.

  
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    ENGL 326 - Latin American Magical Realism


    Credits: Three (3)
    Magical Realism is an interesting and distinctive yet complex genre, combining elements of the fantastic and true-to-life in ways that differ from conventional, English-influenced fantasy stories. While many feature elements of what Americans consider imaginary, at the same time many of the novels are also deeply rooted in the politics and culture of their countries. For many critics, the genre emerged from and is best defined by twentieth-century Latin American writers. This class will examine the conventions and contradictions of this genre, ways in which individual writers employ language and storytelling techniques, and some of the complex relationships between these writers, their novels, their varied countries of origin, and the role of their original languages and translation.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-126
  
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    ENGL 327 - Early American Voices


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course will study major authors and literary movements from the Puritan Era to the end of the Civil War. By analyzing fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays, we will trace the development of an American consciousness and identity from the 17th to the 19th century. Authors will include writers such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Whitman, and Dickinson.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-127
  
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    ENGL 328 - Science Fiction


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    Since the first half of the 20th century, Science Fiction has evolved into one of the most vibrant literary forms, especially in the United States and Britain. This class will explore a variety of themes presented in classic and contemporary works of this genre. Readings will range from 19th century writers through the “New Wave” of the 1960s to current writers. Authors may include H.G. Wells, Ray Bradbury, Ursula K. LeGuin, John Varley, Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, and others.”
    Cross-listed: ENGL-128
  
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    ENGL 329 - WRITING FICTION


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101
    In this course, we will examine what it takes to craft a successful short story, from inspiration to publication. We will learn some of the basics of good writing, with special attention to plot, form, character, and tone. We will read and respond to one another’s works-in-progress, learning from our collective abilities. We will learn practical strategies for finding inspiration. And along the way, we will expose ourselves to some of contemporary fiction’s most vibrant voices.
    Cross-listed: ENGL 129
  
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    ENGL 350 - Write Short: Fiction, Nonfiction and Poetry


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101
    Some of the most interesting work today in contemporary literature engages short forms. In this course, we will read, discuss, generate and revise creative writing in short form, in poetry, fiction and non-fiction. Readings and writing assignments will revolve around flash fiction and non-fiction, the short poem, Japanese haiku, the uses of aphorism, the uses of short sentences, and genre-blur (is it a prose poem? Flash fiction? Flash creative nonfiction?)
    Cross-listed: ENGL-150
  
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    ENGL 352 - OXFORD TUTORIAL IN CREATIVE WRITING


    Credits: Three to Five
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and writing portfolio submitted to the English Department.
    Coursework includes meeting regularly with Oxford University professors, attending lectures, and participating in writing workshops.  Students are encouraged to write fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry.
  
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    ENGL 357 - World Literature I: The Dawn of Story


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    This class begins four thousand years ago, with the Epic of Gilgamesh, the first great work of world literature, and then moves through the ancient and medieval world up to the 17th century. Readings may draw from classic works such as The Odyssey, Greek tragedies and comedies, The Aeneid, Beowulf, The Divine Comedy, The Journey to the West, Narrow Road to the Interior, The Canterbury Tales, and Don Quixote. The class may also include writers such as Plato, Aristotle, and Augustine, as well as selections from the Bible, the Koran, and the Bhagavad-Gita.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-257
  
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    ENGL 358 - World Literature II: The Modern Mind


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    Individuality and personal freedom, or alienation and existential despair? This class explores the development of modernity as reflected and developed in the literatures of the world from the 18th century to the present. Readings will be drawn from various global traditions, and may include authors such as Goethe, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Baudelaire, Rilke, Lu Xun, Kafka, Akhmatova, Camus, Abe, and Allende.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-258
  
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    ENGL 360 - Theatre in St Louis


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    This course studies dramatic literature and performance through viewing, discussing and writing about professional, academic and community theatre productions in the St. Louis area.
    Cross-listed: HUM-360
  
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    ENGL 361 - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
  
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    ENGL 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
  
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    ENGL 406 - Writing Tutorial


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104 or ENGL-204H; Permission of the Instructor
    The student undertakes and completes a substantial writing project under the direction of a full-time faculty member in English or communication.
  
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    ENGL 407 - Advanced Creative Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    ENGL 407 Advanced Creative Writing is an advanced level course designed to refine skills in fiction and poetry.Through writing workshops and discussions of assigned texts, we’ll deepenour engagement with strategies of style in narrative and lyric writing. Original work generated by students will be our primary texts. Emphasis will be given to revision of creative work.
  
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    ENGL 411 - Teaching and Assessing Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; and Permission of the Instructor
    This course is designed for prospective writing teachers. The students learn strategies for teaching and assessing writing and do research on writing instruction. Students serve as teaching assistants in a college-level writing class, where they are mentored by an English professor.
  
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    ENGL 412 - Monsters in Film and Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101
    This course will look at influential modern works such as Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, recent revisionism by writers such as Anne Rice and Octavia Butler, and a few of the many monster movies. Students will consider the language, structure, origins, contexts, and implications of the stories.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-212, ENGL-212H
  
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    ENGL 455 - Modern Fantasy Literature


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    The fantastic has been around in literature as early as the medieval and Renaissance periods and even earlier (Beowulf, the King Arthur legends, The Faerie Queene, A Midsummer Night’s Dream). Many people actually believed in trolls, elves and dragons. But why does Fantasy persist, even thrive, in the modern period? How do we define Fantasy as a genre? We will ask such questions as we adventure in the worlds of William Morris, George MacDonald, Lord Dunsany, E. R. Eddison, Robert E. Howard, J. R. R. Tolkien and Stephen R. Donaldson. We will investigate our need for quests, explore the unknown and unusual, and encounter characters that defy the categories of being.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-255
  
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    ENGL 491 - Literary Magazine Internship


    Credits: One (1) to Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Students must apply to and interview with Magnolia’s faculty advisor
    Each spring, five to seven students are selected to be on the editorial staff of the Maryville literary magazine, Magnolia. Students who can edit, proofread, design graphics, do layout and other design work, and plan public relations and advertising campaigns are invited to apply. Interested students from all majors are eligible. The entire staff of the magazine works together to decide the written and artistic content of the magazine.
  
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    ENGL 493 - Cooperative Education


    Credits: One (1) to Six (6)
  
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    ENGL 495 - Research in the Humanities


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104, or ENGL- 204H; Minimum grade C-
    The student undertakes and completes a substantial research project under the direction of a full-time faculty member in Humanities.
    Cross-listed: HUM-495
  
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    ENGL 496 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
  
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    ENGL 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101; Minimum grade C-
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    ENGL 498 - Seminar: Your Brain on Language


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-104, or ENGL- 204H; Minimum grade C-
    This course introduces the student to the study of the English language as a cultural subject, as a means to understanding how usage changes, how vocabulary changes, how orthography changes, and how these changes are effected. The history of the English language will also be studied along with the various linguistic influences impacting its development. Along with the historical study, the class will consider the development of English grammar and punctuation.
    Note: English majors may take this course as a capstone course.
  
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    ENGL 499 - Internship


    Credits: One (1) to Six (6)
    Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
    Note: Up to six credits in ENGL 499 may be counted toward an English major.
  
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    ESL 100 - Intensive ESL


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course includes intensive practice focused on improving TOEFL scores in addition to developing language skills.  Attention is also given to the skills needed to succeed in an American college classroom. This course is offered only for non-native speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the student’s score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 101 - Listening and Speaking


    Credits: Four (4)
    This course develops students’ ability to make oral presentations, retell stories, participate in face-to-face conversations, and identify the main ideas and factual information in level-appropriate listening passages. Students meet weekly with a tutor for one hour of conversation practice. This course is offered only for non-native speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the student’s score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 102 - Reading for College


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on improving reading comprehension and on increasing vocabulary. Students will learn to identify the main point in a variety of academic texts and to recognize supporting details.  Summarizing and drawing conclusions from readings will also be emphasized. This course is offered only for non-native speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the student’s score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 103 - Writing and Research


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on writing multiple-paragraph compositions that demonstrate organization of ideas, use of a thesis statement, and support of ideas. Skills required for academic writing are emphasized. The course includes an introduction to skills for academic research. This course is offered only for non-native speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the students score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 104 - Intensive ESL


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course includes intensive practice focused on improving TOEFL scores in addition to developing language skills.  Attention is also given to the skills needed to succeed in an American college classroom. This course is offered only for non-native English speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the students score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 105 - Listening and Speaking


    Credits: Four (4)
    This course develops students’ ability to make oral presentations, retell stories, participate in face-to-face conversations, and identify the main ideas and factual information in level-appropriate listening passages. This course is offered only for non-native English speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the student’s score on the TOEFL or IELTS. 
  
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    ESL 106 - Reading for College


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on improving reading comprehension and on increasing vocabulary. Students will learn to identify the main point in a variety of academic texts and to recognize supporting details.  Summarizing and drawing conclusions from readings will also be emphasized. This course is offered only for non-native English speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the students score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 107 - Writing and Research


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on writing multiple-paragraph compositions that demonstrate organization of ideas, use of a thesis statement, and support of ideas. Skills required for academic writing are emphasized. The course includes an introduction to skills for academic research. This course is offered only for non-native English speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the students score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 108 - Intensive ESL


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course is designed for international students preparing to begin a degree program.  It includes intensive practice focused on improving TOEFL scores in addition to developing language skills. Attention is also given to the skills needed to succeed in an American college classroom. This course is offered only for non-native English speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the students score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 109 - Listening and Speaking


    Credits: Four (4)
    This course focuses on developing students’ listening comprehension and presentation skills. Students will understand main ideas and specific details of conversations on academic and general interest topics; take notes while listening and summarize the information orally; produce oral summaries of written material; give presentations on topics of general interest; participate in and orally summarize the outcome of group discussions; and develop an ability to support opinions and explain ideas in detail. This course is offered only for non-native English speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the students score on the TOEFL or IELTS.
  
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    ESL 110 - Academic Reading


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on improving reading comprehension and increasing vocabulary.  Students work on improving their comprehension of material drawn from a variety of academic subject areas. Critical thinking and active reading strategies are emphasized.  This course is offered only for non-native English speakers.  Placement in ESL classes is based on the students score on the TOEFL or IELTS. 
  
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    ESL 111 - Writing and Research


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course focuses on the skills needed for writing academic reports and essays and on demonstrating comprehension through written responses. The course introduces students to research skills for academic writing.  Students will write a series of essays that incorporate research. This course is offered only for non-native English speakers. Placement in ESL classes is based on the students score on the TOEFL or IELTS. 
  
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    ESL 112 - Intensive ESL Grammar


    Credits: Three (3)
    In this grammar course students develop their knowledge of the form, meaning, and correct use of grammatical structures.  Students will review verb tenses related to present, past, and future time frames.  They will also study the grammatical uses and forms of nouns, pronouns, adverbs, articles, comparisons, modals, questions, and clauses.
  
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    ESL 297 - Special Studies - Intensive ESL


    Credits: Three (3)
    The primary emphasis of this course will be on improving written skills in English. Students will also participate in class activities to enhance speaking, listening, and reading skills as needed. This course is offered for International Students only and does not satisfy General Education requirements.
  
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    EXSC 110 - INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE


    Credits: Three
    The course provides an overview of the exercise science profession to include the history of exercise science, career opportunities, and certifications available.  The concepts of basic physiological, neurological, and biomechanical processes associated with physical activity and human movement will be discussed.  Students will be given the opportunity to meet with experts in the field and learn about the various career opportunities.  Content based on guidelines published by the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Strength and Conditioning Association.
  
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    EXSC 210 - STRESS MANAGEMENT


    Credits: Two
    The course provides a comprehensive approach to stress management that is proactive and motivating. Topics include physical, emotional, intellectual, social, spiritual, and environmental wellness.  Emphasis is given to the conceptual frameworks and the applied aspects of sport performance enhancement and mental skills, exercise behavior and motivation, sociological factors, and health and well-being. Applications are made to future practitioners of coaching, teaching, sports medicine, counseling, sport management, and fitness instruction.
  
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    EXSC 220 - CARE & PREVENTION OF INJURIES


    Credits: Three
    The course is designed to provide entry level knowledge in the field of sport related injuries. This course includes units dealing with basic anatomy of common injuries, evaluation techniques, and preventive measures to reduce the incidences of injuries and a knowledge of basic treatment procedures to be used after injuries occur. Legal and ethical issues will also be discussed. This course includes adult CPR, child CPR, and first aid. In addition, OSHA recommendations, blood borne pathogen precautions, and injuries are discussed.
  
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    EXSC 230 - NUTRITION OF EXERCISE MANAGEMENT


    Credits: Three
    The course discusses the study of body mass regulation, including the understanding of food, digestion, metabolism and different intervention strategies such as a diet and exercise. Students learn assessment and prescription principles and techniques.
  
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    EXSC 250 - PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH


    Credits: Three
    The course emphasis is on positive lifestyle practices to reduce one’s risk for disease and for the maintenance of health and vitality. Topics include health behavior, stress, psychological health, chronic diseases, sexually transmitted infections, immunology, and psychoactive substance use and abuse. Community and Population health will also be examined.
  
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    EXSC 260 - HEALTH AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY


    Credits: Three
    The course includes aspects of psychology for understanding and explaining behavior in the context of exercise and sport. Discussions of identifying high-risk individuals, counseling and referring individuals for help are emphasized. The course will also examine the relationships between psychological factors and human physical activity while obtaining peak performance. Evaluating published research, particularly theory and research methodology practices will be required.  Motivational interviewing and behavioral change theory will be briefly discussed.
  
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    EXSC 301 - FIELD EXPERIENCE I


    Credits: One
    The course details the study of exercise testing and prescription for all age groups at every athletic level, including special needs and at-risk athletes/clients. Exercise prescription, testing for optimal performance and wellness, demonstrations, a practical component, and review of the current literature are featured.  Field Experience I requires 50 contact hours in an operational or clinical setting.
  
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    EXSC 302 - FIELD EXPERIENCE II


    Credits: One
    Personal Trainer Track: The course studies general topics in sports science including youth, adolescent, and adult participation assessments, assessment of upper and lower extremities in relationship to injury and performance, return to play criteria and management, and common injuries involving musculoskeletal systems. Demonstration, a practical component, and a review of current literature are featured.  Field Experience II requires 50 contact hours in an operational or clinical setting.

    Wellness Management Track: The course studies general topics in health promotion and wellness including youth, adolescent, and adult participation assessments, community/public health program design and operation.  Field Experience II requires 50 contact hours in an operational or clinical setting.

  
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    EXSC 305 - STRENGTH TRAINING & CONDITIONING LAB


    Credits: One
    The course provides hands-on demonstration and practical application of Strength Training & Conditioning concepts.  Students apply exercise science principles to develop an 8 to 12 week strength and conditioning program.  Students design programs based on personal or client goals and a need’s analysis.  Appropriate gym attire is required.
  
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    EXSC 310 - EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: BIOL 102
    The course discusses physiological principles of exercise. Topics include: bioenergetics, energy expenditure, functions of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular and neuroendocrine systems, muscle, renal function, training, environmental influences, ergogenic aids, nutrition, weight control, and body composition. (Lab required)
  
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    EXSC 310L - EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY LAB


    Credits: One
    The course provides hands-on practical application of topics discussed in EXSC 310 Exercise Physiology.  An overview includes topics on bioenergetics and energy expenditure, functions of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular and neuroendocrine systems, and body composition.  Lab experiments will consist of circulatory and respiratory responses to exercise; respiratory metabolic measurements,
    identification of the lactate and ventilator thresholds, assessment of maximal oxygen uptake, energy cost of physical activity, assessments of rate of perceived exertion, and assessments of body composition.
  
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    EXSC 320 - BIOMECHANICS / KINESIOLOGY


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: BIOL 102
    The course introduces basic physical concepts as they apply to human movement. Emphasis is placed upon structural anatomy, neuromuscular physiology, and biomedical principles as they apply to sport skills, injury assessments, fitness activities, and rehabilitative exercises.Applies fundamental biomechanical principles to the human musculoskeletal system.  Topics include musculoskeletal mechanics, and
    quantitative analysis of human movement. (Lab required)
  
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    EXSC 320L - BIOMECHANICS / KINESIOLOGY LAB


    Credits: One
    The course provides hands-on practical application of topics discussed in EXSC 320 Biomechanics/Kinesiology.  Lab experiments will consist of Vicon video motion capture analysis, force plate, GPS and manual muscle assessments, electromyography (EMG), ultrasound, and video sports-skill analysis.  
  
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    EXSC 322 - ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY


    Credits: Three
    The course focuses on age-related changes in human movement. Changes in the sensory, neuromuscular, and central neural systems will be addressed, as well as the development of adaptive strategies and the application of various therapeutic techniques to enhance motor performance. Recent experimental findings will be incorporated where appropriate.
  
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    EXSC 323 - MOVEMENT HEALTH & EXERCISE


    Credits: Three
    The course covers topics involving the development of motor learning and control systems, as well as introductory concepts in program design for speed, strength, power, and endurance, and explores specific methods of strength and conditioning.
  
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    EXSC 340 - PERSONNEL & HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


    Credits: Three
    The course comprises program planning, theories and models of human and sport performance, development of team/client schedules for facility use, program implementation, including mission, goals, objectives, and activities of human and sports performance programs. Introduces needs assessment and program evaluation, as well as staff management and data analysis.
  
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    EXSC 341 - MARKETING & BUDGETING FOR SPORTS


    Credits: Three
    The course provides an overview of the principles and practices of promoting, marketing and budgeting in the sports and fitness industries. Topics include market analysis and segmentation, marketing planning, target market identification and analysis, sponsorship, fundraising, and budgeting for sports & fitness centers. Budgeting topics cover both for profit and non-profit organizations.
  
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    EXSC 350 - HEALTH PROGRAM PLANNING & EVALUATION


    Credits: Three
    The course will present theories/models for health promotion program planning and implementation in community health settings. Steps to program planning include a needs assessment, logic models, community organizing, program evaluation and social marketing will be addressed. 
  
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    EXSC 353 - VIRTUAL FITNESS AND HEALTH


    Credits: Three
    The course discusses concepts and application of fitness, health and wellness principles in a digital world.  Topics include online fitness consultations, motivational interviewing, video analysis of exercise prescription, and blogging/vlogging.  Common smartphone applications, website and social media usage is discussed to enhance accountability and education for online training clients.
  
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    EXSC 410 - EXERCISE TESTING AND PRESCRIPTION


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: EXSC 310
    The course examines techniques of evaluation for physical fitness and health with a particular emphasis on aerobic capacity, flexibility, strength, and body composition and to design, implement, and  administer programs for developing physical fitness and lifestyle changes. (Lab Required)
  
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    EXSC 410L - EXERCISE TESTING PRESCRIPTION LAB


    Credits: One
    The course provides a hands-on practical application of basic principles and skills learned in EXSC 410 Exercise Testing and Prescription.  Emphasis is placed on the proper techniques associated with assessing health-related components of physical fitness for the development of appropriate exercise prescriptions for individuals.
  
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    EXSC 420 - APPLIED SPORTS / EXERCISE SCIENCE


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: EXSC 320
    The course outlines the various disciplines that play important roles in sports performance enhancement.  Course topics include practical application of relevant research in sports biomechanics, motor learning, exercise physiology, sociology, and sports psychology. Students are required to apply foundational knowledge to real world sports scenarios to solve problems, enhance training, reduce injuries, or
    improve performance.
  
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    EXSC 430 - APPLIED NUTRITION


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: EXSC 320
    The course outlines metabolism, thermodynamics and nutritional requirements associated with the performance of exercise. Course emphasis is on maximizing physical performance through nutrition periodization. Course topics include in-depth coverage of nutrient quantities and qualities, and the timing of nutrient consumption as they relate to exercise performance and training adaptations.  This course will involve a comprehensive case analysis and evidence based practice to develop appropriate nutrition recommendations for athlete/client populations. The course will also delve into the efficacy and relevance of supplementation.
  
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    EXSC 431 - EXERCISE RELATED PHARMACOLOGY


    Credits: Three
    The course discusses general terminology, concepts and principles of pharmacology in the field of exercise science.  Topics include relevant drug categories, common dosage, ranges and routes of drug administration with an understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action and interaction (contraindications, side effects and implications) of various pharmacological agents.  Emphasis will range from drugs used for hypertension, diabetes, epilepsy, asthma, cardiac abnormalities, CVD, cardiac arrhythmias, orthopedic problems and common illnesses.
  
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    EXSC 440 - FITNESS MANAGEMENT


    Credits: Three
    The course examines management principles relating to facility design, budgeting, purchasing, marketing, fitness center program development (front-end & back-end offers, special promotions), and personnel issues in the field of exercise and wellness.
  
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    EXSC 450 - HEALTH PROMOTION, DISEASE & DISABILITY


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: EXSC 320
    The course discusses the personal, cultural and environmental factors affecting participation in health promotion, disease and disability prevention activities; examining the application and relevance of the concepts of health, wellness, health promotion, and health education. The importance of providing appropriate, individualized health and wellness care that is sensitive to the ethnic, racial, gender, and age differences within and across diverse populations is stressed and the role of the wellness practitioner is emphasized.
  
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    EXSC 451 - CURRENT HEALTH ISSUES


    Credits: One
    The course addresses issues relevant to exercise science, wellness and sports medicine.  The course provides a broad overview of the many dimensions exercise plays on health promotion, wellness, and sport. Topics covered include health organizations, communicable and chronic diseases, socioeconomic issues, environmental issues, and other topics related to epidemiology, as well as a review of program planning, development of interventions, and implementation of programs.
  
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    EXSC 480 - ADVANCED PROGRAM DESIGN


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: EXSC 320
    The course builds upon program design principles and periodization.  Emphasis will be placed on examining outcomes associated with various resistance training programs.  A strong application of acute program variables (frequency, intensity, tempo, rest, volume) will be analyzed through case studies.  Principles of precision, progression and integration are discussed and applied.
  
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    EXSC 490 - EXERCISE SCIENCE PRACTICUM


    Credits: Six
    The course provides a culminating experience for the BS in Exercise Science program.  Students complete 300 supervised contact hours (50 contact hours per credit hour) in a setting of their choice, from a list of designated university partners.  Supervised field experiences may include fitness, wellness, sports training, exercise physiology and/or motor control.  Students may also choose to include research, management or community fitness projects.
  
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    EXSC 491 - EXERCISE SCIENCE CAPSTONE


    Credits: Three
    The senior capstone course integrates the knowledge, concepts and professional skills gained from prior coursework in exercise science.  Students choose between two different options: (1) an applied project in which the student develops a hypothetical applied case and intervention program for a client or team in order to synthesize and demonstrate the ability to understand, develop, and advance the principles of exercise science or (2) conduct a research project in which the student displays the development of research techniques, including the ability to define a research problem, write hypotheses, review the literature, apply a research design, collect and analyze data, and interpret the results.
  
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    FIN 215 - Personal Finance


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: MATH-116 or higher
    Studies the basic analytical tools needed for personal financial planning and decision making. Topics covered will include the monitoring and management of personal finances, protection of financial resources, financial investment and growth, and long-term financial planning.
  
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    FIN 312 - Principles of Finance


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ACCT-210, MATH-141, or ISYS-241
    Students examine basic financial management of business firms: a) procurement, b) allocation and c) control of funds; corporate financial behavior; financial instruments and markets; and the analysis and interpretation of investment and profit performance.
  
  •  

    FIN 319 - Financial Institutions


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ECON-201
    This course examines the functions and practices of the major types of financial institutions in our economy. Students will understand the basic operations of - and issues surrounding - commercial banks, thrifts, insurance companies, mutual funds, pension funds, finance companies, venture capital firms, investment banks, and brokerage firms. Students will also learn the basic functions of the Federal Reserve System.
  
  •  

    FIN 350 - Survey of Careers In Finance


    Credits: One (1)
    This course will expose students to various careers in financial services, including corporate finance, commercial banking, investment banking, financial advising, money management, insurance, operations support, compliance, etc., for those trying to choose a career path.
  
  •  

    FIN 351 - Succeeding as a Financial Advisor


    Credits: One (1)
    This course is intended to provide prospective and new financial advisors with the perspective required to be a better decision maker and to avoid some of the most common pitfalls of new advisors.
  
  •  

    FIN 352 - Investment Banking


    Credits: One (1)
    This course is an in-depth look at raising capital on Wall Street through investment banking. Students will learn to distinguish between primary and secondary markets, equity issues, bond issues, IPOs, private placements, and careers in investment banking.
  
  •  

    FIN 353 - Financial Services Compliance And The Regulatory Environment


    Credits: One (1)
    Financial Services firms all share a common concern - regulatory compliance. This course covers the core compliance issues that someone considering, or training for, a career in financial services will face, including ethics, privacy, advertising and correspondence, trading and prohibited transactions, product appropriateness, fiduciary requirements and social networking.


  
  •  

    FIN 354 - Commercial Bank Management


    Credits: One (1)
    This course is an introductory look at how commercial banks are managed. Students will examine interest rate risk management, loan portfolios and the regulatory environment of commercial banks. Careers in commercial banking will be explained.


  
  •  

    FIN 355 - Understanding Insurance


    Credits: One (1)
    This course covers the role of insurance in managing risk. Various types of insurance, including property/casualty, life, health, disability, professional and mortgage, will be explained. Students will examine careers in the insurance industry.


  
  •  

    FIN 356 - International Financing Decisions


    Credits: One (1)
    This course examines international financing considerations regarding foreign direct investment, international capital andamp; money markets, multi-national firm operations, and the diversification of portfolios through foreign securities. Additionally the course will cover importing andamp; exporting procedures, international trade law, customs andamp; compliance, intercom terms andamp; insurance, financing foreign trade, and currency risk.


  
  •  

    FIN 357 - Securities Operations


    Credits: One (1)
    This course will examine the mechanics of trading securities, options, and futures. This includes quotation, order activation, order execution, settlement, and clearing. Students will examine various order types, required documentation andamp; communications, relevant regulations, and prevalent procedures associated with trading various financial instruments. Additionally, students will learn about the tools necessary for the transfer of funds, the systems in place for trading of financial instruments, and the technical necessities of a modern broker-dealer.


  
  •  

    FIN 370 - Intermediate Finance


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-312
    This is an advanced course in financial management of corporations. Topics include valuation techniques, risk and capital budgeting, capital markets, investment banking, long term debt and lease financing, common and preferred stock financing, dividend policy and retained earnings and international financial management. Emphasis will be put on current events in finance and the relationship between finance and the economy.
  
  •  

    FIN 401 - Financial Industry Exam Preparation 1


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course prepares students for licensing in the securities industry. The course exposes students to topics in the securities industry, including governmental regulation, necessary documentation, the role of a broker/dealer, the role of a registered representative, opening client accounts, equity securities, debt securities, options, funds, annuities, and suitability requirements.


  
  •  

    FIN 415 - Securities Analysis/Investment Techniques


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-312
    Students are introduced to financial investment alternatives, security markets, analytical techniques and portfolio management theories.
  
  •  

    FIN 420 - Sport Finance


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-312
    This course explores contemporary examples from marketing sponsorship, facility construction and sport law to illustrate the crucial role that money plays in any sport business. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the receipt, disbursement and utilization of funds can foster future growth in the sport businesses. The course will deal with such issues as sports financial analysis, capital structuring and capital budgeting, profitable distribution systems and the management of financial risk.
    Cross-listed: SPTM-420
  
  •  

    FIN 421 - Portfolio Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-415
    A study of the practical management of portfolios containing varied financial assets, the course examines the issues in, and the procedures for, portfolio management. The emphasis is on personal portfolio management by individual investors. The course assumes a basic knowledge of securities and personal financial planning.


  
  •  

    FIN 430 - Money and Banking


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ECON-201 and ECON-202
    This course helps students understand the functions of money and the financial system in the economy. Students will analyze interest rates and the applications of the time-value-of-money concept. They will learn the basics of central banking and the Federal Reserve System. After taking this course, students will understand the workings of the financial system and the goals and limitations of monetary policy; they will have a more informed perspective on the various issues surrounding money, banking, and government policies related to money and banking.


    Cross-listed: ECON-430

  
  •  

    FIN 450 - Financial Planning


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-215
    This course involves the study of financial planning and the process involved in helping clients determine and meet their financial objectives. Investment strategies and wealth management will be considered along with retirement planning and the transfer of an individual’s estate after death.


  
  •  

    FIN 470 - International Trade and Money


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ECON-201 and ECON-202
    This course studies the economic principles involved in international trade and finance. It is designed to provide the student with the conceptual tools needed to analyze such international economic issues as import tariffs and quotas, import liberalization, loss of jobs to foreign countries, free-trade agreements, and exchange-rate fluctuations. The general topics to be covered in this course include the pure theory of trade, the theory of trade policy (such as trade restrictions and economic integration), international economic institutions, foreign-exchange markets and exchange rates, and the international monetary system.


    Cross-listed: ECON-470

  
  •  

    FIN 496 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
  
  •  

    FIN 601 - Financial Industry Exam Preparation 1


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-630
    This course prepares students for licensing in the securities industry. The course exposes students to topics in the securities industry, including governmental regulation, necessary documentation, the role of a broker/dealer, the role of a registered representative, opening client accounts, equity securities, debt securities, options, funds, annuities, and suitability requirements. Additionally, this course challenges student to apply security industry fundamentals through projects and case studies.


  
  •  

    FIN 630 - Corporate Financial Policies


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ACCT-610
    Students examine areas of concern for financial managers: the financial analysis of the firm, including ratio analysis and fixed and variable cost analysis.
  
  •  

    FIN 635 - Financial Institutions, Money and the Economy


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-630
    This course helps students understand the functions of money and the financial system in the economy. It examines the functions and main products and services of the major types of financial institutions, and how they manage their business risks. Students will analyze the operations of and the issues faced by commercial banks, thrifts, insurance companies, mutual funds, pension funds, finance companies, venture capital firms, investment banks and brokerage firms.


  
  •  

    FPAR 205H - Writing/Performing The 10-Minute Play


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    “The lunatic, the lover and the poet are of imagination all compact.” Add the playwright and the actor to Shakespeare’s list. In this course, student playwrights mine imagination and experience for characters and plots they then polish on stage. Students write three plays and act in one or more plays in each of two public performances. Through acting exercises, they sharpen their performance skills and find inspiration for plots and characters. “In a minute there is time for decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.” And 10 minutes, lovingly crafted and gamely acted, puts on stage all this “little O, the earth.” Read some of the 10-minute plays students have written at http://accweb.itr.maryville.edu/schwartz/10-minute %20play%20scripts.htm
  
  •  

    FPAR 205H - Writing/Performing The 10-Minute Play


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    “The lunatic, the lover and the poet are of imagination all compact.” Add the playwright and the actor to Shakespeare’s list. In this course, student playwrights mine imagination and experience for characters and plots they then polish on stage. Students write three plays and act in one or more plays in each of two public performances. Through acting exercises, they sharpen their performance skills and find inspiration for plots and characters. “In a minute there is time for decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.” And 10 minutes, lovingly crafted and gamely acted, puts on stage all this “little O, the earth.” Read some of the 10-minute plays students have written at http://accweb.itr.maryville.edu/schwartz/10-minute%20play%20scripts.htm


  
  •  

    FPAR 206H - Cultural Studies of Rock’N’Roll


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This course will explore rock andamp; roll’s origins, contexts, images, lyrics, and the music itself. Students will consider how the music creates meaning and what the relationship of rock andamp; roll is to American culture and history.
    Cross-listed: HUM-206H
  
  •  

    FPAR 210 - Performance Workshop I


    Credits: Three (3)
    A course designed for people who desire experience for public presentations and/or performances. Various strategies will be employed including acting, oral interpretation, mime and improvisation.
  
  •  

    FPAR 211 - Performance Workshop II


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course continues the individual and group performance work of FPAR 210.
  
  •  

    FPAR 261 - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: ENGL101
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
    Cross-listed: ENGL 261/361, FPAR 361
  
  •  

    FPAR 261H - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Four
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101; membership in Bascom Honors Program
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
    Cross-listed: ENGL 261H
  
  •  

    FPAR 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: Program Director Approval
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
  •  

    FPAR 361 - WRITING FOR STAGE AND SCREEN


    Credits: Three
    Prerequisite: ENGL 101
    This workshop-style course focuses on the art and craft of dramatic writing. By first examining dramatic works of literature as well as cinematic screenplays, students will learn and practice style and techniques that are geared towards composition for a visual medium, whether that be in theatre or film. Then, students will compose and workshop their own original story outline that will become either a short 10-minute play or screenplay of a short 10-minute film. Students will then have the opportunity to either stage their short play or shoot their short film using their iPads.
    Cross-listed: ENGL 261/361, FPAR 261
 

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