2016-2017 Academic Catalog 
    
    Jan 24, 2020  
2016-2017 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


Undergraduate Prerequisites Course Numbering
A “C-” or higher is required in all prerequisite courses 100-299 - Lower division undergraduate
  300-499 - Upper division undergraduate
  500-699 - Graduate
Search Tip 700-799 - Doctoral
Use the asterisk (*) key as a wild card.
Example: Select “Prefix” NURS and enter 6* in the “Code or Number” field to return all Nursing courses at the 600 level.

 

 
  
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    SOC 328 - Mental Illness and Society


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-202H, PSYC-101, PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course addresses mental illness and its impact on various institutions of society.The definitions and symptoms of mental illnesses will be presented.The focus will be on how mental illness impacts societal institutions, including criminal justice, occupational, educational, and others.Particular emphasis is placed on problems and limitations in the mental health system and how society is adversely affected by those problems.The course objective is to learn a realistic appraisal of mental illnesses and effective philosophies and methodologies to begin correcting problems related to mental illness in society.
    Cross-listed: PSYC-328
  
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    SOC 330 - Human Sexuality


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, SOC-202H, PSYC-101, PSYC-101F, or PSYC-202H; Minimun grade C-
    This course surveys the social, biological, and psychological aspects of human sexual behavior. Scientific research related to sexual anatomy, arousal, gender, and life span sexual behavior will be explored. Topics may also include but are not limited to sexual orientation, cultural variations in attraction and love, and sexual morality.
    Cross-listed: PSYC-330
  
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    SOC 340 - Social Aspects of the Aged


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-202H, PSYC-101, PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course examines the problems and issues relevant to America’s elderly population, focusing on financial concerns, public policy, health and institutionalization.
    Cross-listed: PSYC-340
  
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    SOC 341 - Understanding Statistical Inference


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: MATH-115 or higher; Minimum grade C-
    This course introduces students to both descriptive and inferential statistics. The following concepts and techniques are included: measures of central tendency and variability; sampling distributions; interval estimation; hypothesis testing (t-test, ANOVA); correlation and regression; chi square tests. Statistical software projects are required.

     
    Cross-listed: CRIM/PSYC-341

  
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    SOC 342 - Research Methods


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course introduces the process of scientific research in the social and behavioral sciences and the fundamental role research methodology plays in our understanding of human behavior and social affairs. Students will explore the principles, ethics, and methods of social science research (correlational research, observational and survey methods, experimental and quasi-experimental design, variable control, secondary data analysis, and interpretation of results). Students will become familiar with the ways social scientists communicate their research to other scientists by writing a formal research paper.
    Note: Note: To ensure students success it is strongly recommended that students complete SOC 341 before enrolling in SOC 342 or that they enroll in SOC 341 concurrently with SOC 342. See CRIM/SOC 342.
    Cross-listed: CRIM-342, PSYC-342
  
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    SOC 348 - The Sociology of Poverty


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the theories concerning the causes and consequences of poverty in the United States.  The correlates to poverty and its distribution acorss categories (gender, race, age, and rural/urban) of the population wil also be examined.  A critical analysis of the social policy resposes to poverty will conclude the course.
  
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    SOC 350 - Sociology of Health and Health Care


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course examines the health care system including topics on sick role, epidemiology, mortality and morbidity patterns and public policy.
  
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    SOC 351 - Introduction to Women’s Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course uses theoretical frameworks from sociology and social psychology to examine women’s issues and roles in contemporary society as well as their contributions to various disciplines. Topics include socialization, communication, health, media, leadership, sexual harassment, and violence. Women’s contributions to history, politics, education, and science are highlighted.
    Cross-listed: WS-251, WS-351, SOC-251
  
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    SOC 354 - Gender Roles


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    This course examines the major concept of gender in and across societies. The focus will be on sociological perspectives that explain the establishment, maintenance, and consequences of gender divisions in social life.
    Cross-listed: WS-354
  
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    SOC 361 - Sociology of the Family


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    This course is a sociological study of the changing structures, functions, and importance of family as a major societal institution. An analysis of cross-cultural differences in the familial relations and parenting role is emphasized.
  
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    SOC 381 - Urban Sociology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    This course analyzes major trends of urbanization, emphasizing the social problems of modern urban society.
  
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    SOC 382 - Social Class in Society


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    This course surveys various social theories that attempt to understand the role and occurrence of social inequality within societies. It also examines the dynamics of social stratification within society. Particular attention is paid to the influence of social class position on human behavior, attitudes, and individual life chances.
  
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    SOC 385 - Racial and Ethnic Minorities in the United States


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    This course is an in-depth survey of the major racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Among groups considered are African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, Asian- Americans, and European minorities.
  
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    SOC 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-

    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.

  
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    SOC 401 - Sociological Theory


    Credits: Four (4)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    This course surveys the foundations of sociological theory and its contributions to social analysis. Consideration is given to the historical social and intellectual contexts of sociological theory development as well as the distinction in macro and micro theorizing.
  
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    SOC 405 - Domestic and International Terrorism


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSCI-110, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course surveys perspectives pertaining to the etiology of terrorism at both the domestic and international level. Study of the various tactics used by identified terrorist groups is explored. In addition, the techniques of counterterrorism are assessed.
    Cross-listed: CRIM-405
  
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    SOC 454 - Gender and Crime


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    This course explores variation in offending and victimization across the genders. Specific attention will be paid to theories that attempt to explain why such variation exists and such patterns change over time.
    Cross-listed: WS-454
  
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    SOC 461 - Social Work Policy


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Completion of SOC/PSYC-341 and SOC/PSYC-342
    The societal context which shapes the nature of social work practice and the well being of people is seen as the result of countless choices which constitute social policy. The study of social policy and its resultant social welfare system is therefore viewed as a study of the choices which a society makes in satisfying human needs, pursuing social justice, and attaining human goals.This course examines social policy within the context of its historical development and its current functions within contemporary society, and introduces students to the relationship between social policy and social work practice. The course examines the substance of policy choices, the values and beliefs that underlie these choices, the political processes through which the choices are made, and the potential roles of social workers in that process.
    Note: Admission to SLU MSW Bridge Program
  
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    SOC 462 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Completion of SOC/PSYC-341 and SOC/PSYC-342
    This course is designed to introduce the student to theories, bodies of knowledge, and perspectives which provide critical insight into the behavior of individuals and the dynamics of social systems that are consonant with the person in environment definition of social work. The systems approach, symbolic interaction, social constructionism, and life cycle theory serve as the major theoretical perspectives employed to analyze interaction in the system levels through time.The system levels identified as having the greatest salience for social work are the individual, family, group, organization, and community. The critical perspective is used to intergrate theories and knowledge within the value and social justice orientation of social work
    Note: Admission to SLU MSW Bridge Program
  
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    SOC 463 - Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Completion of SOC/PSYC-341 and SOC/PSYC-342
    This course prepares students to apply a generalist perspective and systems framework to direct social work practice with individuals, families, and groups. The starting point is recognition that effective and efficient helping is based on a professional relationship characterized by mutuality, collaboration, and respect. Students learn to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to promote and enhance the well-being of clients and client systems. This course emphasizes the basics of communication, interviewing, relationship building and professional use of self, skills essential to effective social work assessment, intervention and evaluation. Approaches and skills for practice with clients from differing social, cultural, racial, religious, spiritual, and class backgrounds are highlighted throughout the course.
    Note: Admission to SLU MSW Bridge Program
  
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    SOC 464 - Social Work Practice with Communities and Organizations


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Completion of SOC/PSYC-341 and SOC/PSYC-342
    This course prepares students to apply a generalist perspective and systems framework to social work practice with communities and organizations as well as task/problem-solving groups within larger systems and settings.  Students learn to integrate social work values, knowledge, and skills within an ecological framework for planned change with a particular focus on indirect/macro social work practice with populations of special concern to social work.  Of special concern are groups experiencing social and economic injustices based on racial, cultural, class, age, religious/spiritual, gender, sexual orientation, and disability characteristics.
    Note: Admission to SLU MSW Bridge Program
  
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    SOC 472 - Understanding Organizational Behavior


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    Organizational behavior is the scientific study of how people think, feel, and behave in and around organizations. It is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates knowledge from psychology, sociology, and organizational sciences. The purpose of this course is to examine the foundational theories in organizational behavior and their application for the purpose of improving organization effectiveness and individual well-being.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-472, PSYC-472
  
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    SOC 473 - Group Dynamics


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101, PSYC-202H, SOC-101, or SOC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course focuses on the scientific study of sociological and psychological processes in groups. We will explore the theoretical explanations for group processes and the practical application of theory into groups. Topics include but are not limited to theoretical perspectives in group dynamics, group formation and development, structure of groups, group processes, and team effectiveness.
    Cross-listed: ORGL-473, PSYC-473
  
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    SOC 480 - Senior Seminar


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-341 and SOC-342 with minimum grade of C-, and Senior status
    This course is the culminating, capstone experience in the social science curriculum. Students will review and discuss their course of
    study and its application beyond graduation. Students will work with a social science faculty member toward the completion of a research project intended to explore an area of interest in the student’s field of study.

    NOTE: Successful completion of Senior Seminar is achieved upon completion of the student project.
    Cross-listed: CRIM-480, ORGL-480, PSYC-480

  
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    SOC 485 - Race, Ethnicity and Crime


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    This course examines the interrelationship of race/ethnicity and criminal victimization/offending. In-depth consideration will be given to the issue of hate-crimes, racial profiling, wrongful convictions and disparities in sentencing.
    Cross-listed: CRIM-485
  
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    SOC 490 - Social Service in St. Louis


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Senior Status
    This course is designed to give students an introduction to the vast network of social service agencies and community mental health providers in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area. The course includes site visits to various agencies and discussions with representative social service practitioners from programs in chemical and drug dependency, community corrections and crime prevention, crisis intervention, domestic violence, mental health, and other human service areas.
    Cross-listed: PSYC-490
  
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    SOC 495 - Practicum


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-202H, PSYC-101, PSYC-202H; Minimum grade C-
    This course is designed as a culminating experience to integrate theory and practice in the context of an approved field-based experience under the supervision of the course instructor. Practicum requires completion of 150 clock hours on site along with coursework relevant to the student’s field experience.
    Cross-listed: PSYC-495, ORGL-495
  
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    SOC 496 - Independent Study


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-101F, or SOC-202H; Minimum Grade C-
    Junior- or senior-level students may design and conduct an independent study project in a field of their interest under the direction of a faculty adviser.
  
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    SOC 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101, SOC-202H, PSYC-101, PSYC-202H
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces the structures of Spanish with emphasis on speaking, listening, and writing skills.
  
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    SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPAN-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course further develops skills in speaking and writing Spanish. Students are introduced to Spanish fiction and non-fiction.
  
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    SPAN 201 - Intermediate Spanish I


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPAN-102
    A continued development of all language skills, this course emphasizes reading and discussion of fiction and non- fiction. Conducted in Spanish.
  
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    SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPAN-101; Minimum grade C-
    A continued development of all language skills, this course includes reading and discussion of fiction and non-fiction. Conducted in Spanish.
  
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    SPAN 205 - Spanish For The Health Professions


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPAN-102
    This class is designed for those who want to practice speaking Spanish with a focus on healthcare. There will be dialogues, readings, and other activities to help students develop conversational skills that will be useful not only for volunteers going to a Spanish speaking country but for those assisting Hispanic patients in the U.S.
  
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    SPAN 209 - Hispanic Presence in The United States


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course introduces students to the history, culture, and literature of Hispanics in the United States. The course is taught in English.
  
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    SPAN 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    Prerequisite: SPAN-101
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    SPAN 301 - Advanced Spanish I


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPAN-202
  
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    SPAN 302 - Advanced Spanish II


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPAN-301; Minimum grade C
    A continued development of language skills in reading, writing, and speaking. In this class students read and discuss Spanish literature
  
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    SPAN 401 - Advanced Spanish III


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPAN-302
    A continued development of all Spanish skills at an advanced level with special attention to composition.
    Note: Conducted in Spanish.
  
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    SPAN 497 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty. For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptons at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    SPAN 499 - International/ Spanish Language Internship


    Credits: Three (3) to Six (6)
    Prerequisite: Approval-of and Humanities of Program Director
    This course gives students the opportunity to develop their Spanish language proficiency and their awareness of Hispanic culture. Students who study abroad may intern with an organization in the guest country. Students remaining in St. Louis may intern with local firms and organizations that are involved with Hispanic business, education, or culture.
  
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    SPCH 110 - Oral Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys communication principles and types. The major goal is the development of skills in public speaking. Emphasis is placed on speech organization, audience analysis, and delivery.
  
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    SPLP 510 - Speech Sound Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will work on the etiologies and characteristics of phonological disorders.  Specific types of disorders will be studied along with methods of assessment and treatment for these disorders.
  
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    SPLP 520 - Assessment Issues in Speech Language Pathology


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will learn diagnostic processes in the field of communication sciences and disorders. This course will include theoretical foundations of assessment as well as clinical application. Students will identify appropriate assessments, practice giving formal and informal assessments, and participate in diagnostic clinical evaluations.
  
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    SPLP 530 - Acquired Disorders of Language and Cognition


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will learn etiologies, characteristics, assessment strategies, and intervention techniques for effective treatment of neurologically based language and cognitive disorders, such as aphasia, dementia, right hemisphere impairment, and traumatic brain injury.
  
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    SPLP 540 - Practicum I


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will apply skills learned in academic coursework to this clinical practicum. Direct client contact is required, and participants will be supervised by speech-language pathologists with their clinical certification (CCC-SLP). Participants will be responsible for all aspects of their client’s treatment including planning, treating, communicating with the client and the client’s family, and report-writing.
  
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    SPLP 550 - Language Disorders in Children


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will learn strategies for diagnosing and treating children with language disorders from birth through adolescence. Characteristics and etiologies of these disorders developmental and acquired language disorders will be discussed.
  
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    SPLP 560 - Research Methods and Evidence Based Practice


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will prepare participants to become critical consumers of speech-language pathology research. Participants will learn how to apply concepts presented in research studies to clinical practice in order to meet evidence-based practice guidelines. In addition, participants will learn about research design and analysis to prepare them clinical research.
  
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    SPLP 570 - Motor Speech Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will develop a thorough understanding of the etiologies of motor speech disorders, such as cerebral palsy and Lou Gehrig’s Disease, and the speech disorders they may experience, such as dysarthria and apraxia. Participants will learn and practice assessment and treatment strategies to help clients in this challenging population across the lifespan.
  
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    SPLP 575 - Practicum II


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will apply skills learned in academic coursework to this clinical practicum. Direct client contact is required, and participants will be supervised by speech-language pathologists with their clinical certification (CCC-SLP). Participants will be responsible for all aspects of their client’s treatment including planning, treating, communicating with the client and the client’s family, and report-writing.
  
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    SPLP 580 - Practicum III


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will apply skills learned in academic coursework to this clinical practicum. Direct client contact is required, and participants will be supervised by speech-language pathologists with their clinical certification (CCC-SLP). Participants will be responsible for all aspects of their client’s treatment including planning, treating, communicating with the client and the client’s family, and report-writing.
  
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    SPLP 590 - Language and Literacy for Speech Language Pathology


    Credits: Two (2)
    Participants will learn how language and literacy are intertwined and the role of the speech-language pathologist in assessing and treating patients with literacy disorders. This is an elective class.
  
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    SPLP 595 - Special Populations in Communication Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Special Populations in Communication Disorders is designed to present information regarding less prevalent disorders in speech-language pathology.  These disorders include fluency, cleft palate, autism, chromosome disorders, etc.  Material covered will include characteristics, diagnosis and basic intervention techniques.
  
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    SPLP 600 - Augmentative and Alternative Communication


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides participants with an in-depth understanding of assessment and treatment of clients who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), such as pointing to pictures and communication devices with voice output. Hands-on practice will be provided to prepare participants to work with clients in this population across the lifespan.
  
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    SPLP 610 - Professional Issues in Speech Language Pathology


    Credits: One (1)
    Participants in this course will learn about the administrative, legal, and ethical issues in the field of speech-language pathology, such as funding and billing issues, ethical and professional behavior, state licensing, national certification, specialty recognition certifications, and professional organizations, in order to prepare participants to begin their careers in this field.
  
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    SPLP 620 - Dysphagia


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will learn etiologies, assessment, and treatment for individuals with feeding and swallowing disorders in both pediatric and adult populations. Anatomy and physiology for normal and disordered swallowing will be examined. Diagnostic procedures including modified barium swallow (MBS) studies and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) will be included.
  
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    SPLP 630 - Voice Disorders


    Credits: Two (2)
    Participants will learn about the anatomy and physiology of the vocal mechanism. They will study clients who have voice disorders, such as vocal nodules and alaryngeal speech. Assessment and treatment strategies will be studied in depth in order to prepare participants to treat this client population.
  
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    SPLP 640 - Craniofacial Anomalies


    Credits: Two (2)
    Participants will complete an in-depth study of cleft lip, cleft palate and other facial disorders that impact communication and swallowing. Participants will learn assessment and treatment options completed by the speech-language pathologist and the other members of the craniofacial team. 
  
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    SPLP 650 - Comprehensive Examination Preparation


    Credits: One (1)
    This course is specifically designed to prepare the graduate student for the program’s comprehensive examination and the national PRAXIS examination necessary for becoming certified speech-language pathologists. Practice may include case studies, practice tests, and learning methods of studying.
  
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    SPLP 660 - Multicultural Issues in Communication Sciences and Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will learn how cultural and linguistic diversity affect the assessment and treatment of speech-language pathology clients. Participants will also learn about other cultures and will develop intercultural communication competence to prepare them for working with clients and co-workers from diverse backgrounds.
  
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    SPLP 670 - School Externship


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will provide speech and language assessment and intervention services in a school or pediatric setting under the supervision of a CCC-SLP credentialed speech pathologist who is employed by the facility. University faculty or clinical staff will monitor the participant’s progress.
  
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    SPLP 680 - Medical Externship


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants will provide speech and language assessment and intervention services in a hospital, skilled nursing, or other medical setting under the supervision of a CCC-SLP credentialed speech pathologist who is employed by the facility. University faculty or clinical staff will monitor the participant’s progress.
  
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    SPLP 690 - Childhood Speech and Language Seminar


    Credits: Two (2)
    Participants in this seminar will develop advanced knowledge in assessing and treating patients with speech and/or language delays and disorders. Challenging and more complex clients will be studied in particular.
  
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    SPLP 695 - Reading in Communication Disorders


    Credits: Three (3)
    Participants in this seminar will work on reading and analyzing recent research in the field of speech-language pathology on specific topics in order to inform their assessment and treatment practices. This is an elective class.
  
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    SPTM 210 - Sport Business Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: BUS-150 or Sophomore Status
    The course reviews the organizational and managerial foundations of sports management. Both professional and amateur sports industries are considered. The students will study a wide variety of issues related to production and distribution of sports. These include products, event and facility management, and sport communication.
  
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    SPTM 250 - Rawlings Market Research and Development


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPTM-210 and ISYS-100
    This course will introduce research design, implementation, and analysis of research within the field of sport business. Through applied research, both qualitative and quantitative methodologies will be explored. Specifically, the student will work with Rawlings Sporting Goods on requested research projects and be responsible for travel to attend sporting events and collect data. As students collect data for actual events, they will acquire the concepts and skills to commence a research study.
  
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    SPTM 300 - Missouri Valley Conference Sport Event and Facility Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SPTM-210
    This course examines the competencies needed to successfully manage sporting events and facilities. Students will learn the legal, financial and organizational considerations needed to plan, implement and evaluate sporting events and manage multi-purpose venues. Students will integrate theory with practice through participation in a local sporting event such as a championship, tournament or marketing event.


  
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    SPTM 375 - Corporate Sponsorship


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course will focus on the sale, development and activation of sponsorship contracts in the business of Sport. The students will get an in-depth look into building Sponsorship Sales proposals as well as detailed information related to pricing. Those items include, but are not limited to: Valuation, Cost per Exposure, Market Segmentation, Strategy and Communication. The students will get hands-on experience in implementing and executing the Sponsorship contracts from the service side of sponsorship as well as contract fulfillment.


  
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    SPTM 380 - Legal Aspects o’f Sport Business Mgmt


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: BUS-280
    This course examines the United States legal system as it pertains to sports businesses and organizations. Using a managerial perspective, students will learn to identify important legal issues and to design organizational policies that comply with relevant rules and laws. Issues pertaining to human resource management, governance and operations management will be explored.


  
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    SPTM 385 - Sport Promotions


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course highlights aspects of promotions and its integration into the sport business industry. Students will learn how to develop, implement, measure, analyze and fulfill sport promotions. Students in the course will learn to use a variety of avenues to fulfill the goals of the project while adhering to a budget.


  
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    SPTM 400 - Sport Business Analytics


    Credits: Three (3)
    The class will discuss the theory, development, and application of analytics in sports. Students will learn about the application of analytics in sports for purposes of marketing and sales strategy, sports operations, among many other topics. The class will consist of lectures, guest speakers from the sports industry and academia, and culminate with a group project.


  
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    SPTM 415 - Sport Marketing


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: MKT-360
    This course introduces the concepts and theories that are unique to sports marketing and applies the basic principles of marketing to the sport industry. Students will develop a strategic framework to assist in sport marketing decisions. Product development, promotional mix, pricing and distribution will be discussed in detail.
  
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    SPTM 420 - Sport Finance


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN-312
    This course explores contemporary examples from marketing sponsorship, facility construction and sport law to illustrate the crucial role that money plays in any sport business. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the receipt, disbursement and utilization of funds can foster future growth in the sport businesses. The course will deal with such issues as sport financial analysis, capital structuring and capital budgeting, profitable distribution systems and the management of financial risk.
    Cross-listed: FIN-420
  
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    SPTM 425 - “Game Face” Selling in the Business of Sport


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: Senior Sport Business Management Major
    This course offers a comprehensive understanding of the sales process in the sport sector. An overview of sales and service theory, as well as application, is the prime focus for this course. The course is conducted with professional sport business sales consultants. These consultants will train the student in the following areas: prospecting, sales pre-planning, writing sales proposals, preventing and handling objections, sales closing, and post sales servicing. The student will be able to use these selling tools to enhance his or her sales performance in the area of sport business sales and service.


  
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    SPTM 435 - Semester Away Internship


    Credits: Twelve (12)
    Prerequisite: Program Director Approval
    Some opportunities are too unique and too special to fit within the constraints of a traditional student’s schedule. Would you like to spend a semester in Atlanta interning for the Chick-fil-a Bowl or a semester in Denver interning for the Colorado Rockies? The semester away internship allows Rawlings Sport Business Management students to participate in unique internship opportunities by working full-time for a sports organization and receiving 12 credits. The program is perfect for exploring opportunities outside the metro St. Louis area.


  
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    SPTM 440 - “Rawlings” One year Practical Experience Program


    Credits: Twelve (12)
    Prerequisite: Application and Program Director Approval
    Rawlings has been a leader in the sporting goods and apparel industry since 1887 and their world headquarters is located on the Maryville University campus! Each year Rawlings and the Maryville Rawlings Sport Business Management faculty select worthy students to participate in the Rawlings Practical Experience Program. Students in the program learn every aspect of the Rawlings Corporation’s business operations and receive 12-credit hours toward graduation. The program is highly competitive and requires a full year commitment.


  
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    SPTM 445 - “Rawlings” Advanced Application of Sport Business


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: MGMT-410 or SPTM-410
    This course focuses on ethical problems in sports as well as current issues. These issues include government involvement in support of sports, the role of sports in society, the globalization of sports, and the technological advancements in the industry. This course will be instructed in collaboration with Rawlings Sporting Goods Company.
    Cross-listed: MGMT-445
  
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    SPTM 499 - Sport Management Internshp


    Credits: One (1) to Six (6)
  
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    SPTM 615 - Survey Sport and Entertainment Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: MGMT-647
    This course will examine the contemporary issues and trends impacting sport andamp; entertainment business administration from a historical perspective to future trends in the industry. This course utilizes in-depth problem solving instruction and fosters critical thinking on a variety of contemporary issues in the sport andamp; entertainment industry. Topics that will be covered in the course: Sport associations and governing bodies (NCAA, NAIA, MLB, NBA, MLS, NFL, IOC), The Olympic Movement, Issues /trends relating to NCAA legislation, conference realignment, NCAA reform, Issues/trends relating to ticketing, free agency, collective bargaining, revenue-sharing, salary caps, luxury taxes, and government subsidization of stadiums.
  
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    SPTM 620 - Economics of Sport and Entertainment Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ECON-620
    This course explores topics as they relate to fiscal and budgetary control of public and private organizations. Included are: forms of ownership, taxation, financial analysis, feasibility studies, economic impact studies, and insurance considerations. The course also analyzes business aspects of sport andamp; entertainment industries from a collaborative perspective.
  
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    SPTM 675 - Product Development for Sport and Entertainment Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: MKT-660
    The objective of this course is to familiarize students with applications of relatively recent new product planning techniques. The course will emphasize use of market research data and marketing models for new product development and management. The main topics to be covered in this class are: product design, test marketing, product positioning, market segmentation, market share estimation, product packaging, advertising testing and promotion, brand equity, and global product planning.
  
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    SPTM 680 - Sponsorship and Promotion of Sport and Entertainment Management


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: MKT-660
    This course will concentrate on the sponsorship andamp; promotion elements in marketing. The sponsorship andamp; promotions mix will help students to gain an understanding and appreciation of the more encompassing elements of marketing through sponsorship. There will be in-depth study of advanced sponsorship andamp; promotion management issues including negotiation strategies, developing and maintaining long-term corporate customer relationships, alternative strategies, international sales strategies and national account management.
  
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    SUST 101 - Introduction to Sustainability


    Credits: Three
    Introduces students to the theories, principles, and strategies concerning the challenges of living with greater environmental responsibility. Explore ideas and issues relating to sustainability within related disciplines including ethics economics, natural sciences and social sciences.

     

  
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    SUST 150 - Sustainability Exploration Seminar


    Credits: Three
    St. Louis-centered seminar introduces new students to local aspects of sustainability, including visits to places such as city gardens, green spaces, landfills, etc. highlighting the interconnectedness of environmental and social justice concerns.
  
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    SUST 201 - Environmental Science and Health


    Credits: Three
    An introduction to the ecological principles that underlie environmental science and natural resource conversation, students examine the environment as the context for human activities; discussion of the human effects on ecosystems.
  
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    SUST 350 - Sustainability Expedition


    Credits: Three
    A spring break expedition lead by Sustainability instructors – e.g., waterway explorations, city stewardship projects or similar experiences, e.g., Study abroad course with a focus on sustainability (e.g., Jan 2016 Galapagos Islands), Habit for Humanity contracted as Independent study with faculty member, Study Away (2016 New Orleans) contracted as Independent study with faculty member. 

     

  
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    SUST 375 - Strategies in Sustainability


    Credits: Three
    Students discuss approaches to planning and thoughtful use of natural resources with an emphasis on energy conservation, pollution control, reduction of solid and toxic waste and maintaining biodiversity. Also considered are ways that the impacts of human societies can be reduced in the present and future.
  
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    SUST 499 - Sustainability Internship


    Credits: Three
    Students are supervised in fieldwork dealing with environmental problems. Partnerships exist with local, state and federal agencies to provide environmental learning opportunities and experiences.
  
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    WS 110 - Women in American History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the impact of historical events on the lives of American women and, in turn, the many roles women played in shaping American history. Topics include native American womens lives; gender and family life under slavery; the impact of industrialization on women of different classes; the ideology of separate spheres; womens political activities including the anti-slavery movement, the suffrage movement, the 19th Amendment, and the resurgence of feminism in the 1960s; and transformations in the lives of modern women including work, politics, sexuality, con-sumption patterns, and leisure activities.

    Fulfills Social Science Requirement.
    Note: Fulfills state requirements.
    Cross-listed: HIST-110, HIST-310, WS-310

  
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    WS 119 - Survey of Women’s Lit


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101
    A study of the English and American traditions of literature by women. The course focuses on literary analysis and appreciation of fiction, poetry, memoirs, essays, and drama by classical and contemporary authors. The roles of women as authors and as characters will be considered within their historical and literary contexts.

    Fulfills Humanities Requirement.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-119, ENGL-319, WS-319

  
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    WS 251 - Introduction to Women’s Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course uses theoretical frameworks from sociology and social psychology to examine women’s issues and roles in contemporary society as well as their contributions to various disciplines. Topics include socialization, communication, health, media, leadership, sexual harassment, and violence. Women’s contributions to history, politics, education, and science are highlighted.

    Fulfills Social Science Requirement.
    Cross-listed: WS-351, SOC-351, SOC-351

  
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    WS 297 - Special Studies


    Credits: One (1) to Four (4)
    These courses are offered periodically based on the interests of our students and faculty.For more information and a listing of current offerings, please see additional descriptions at www.maryville.edu/specialstudies.
  
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    WS 310 - Women in American History


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course explores the impact of historical events on the lives of American women and, in turn, the many roles women played in shaping American history. Topics include native American womens lives; gender and family life under slavery; the impact of industrialization on women of different classes; the ideology of separate spheres; womens political activities including the anti- slavery movement, the suffrage movement, the 19th Amendment, and the resurgence of feminism in the 1960s; and transformations in the lives of modern women including work, politics, sexuality, consumption patterns, and leisure activities.

    Fulfills Social Science Requirement.
    Note: Fulfills state requirements.
    Cross-listed: HIST-110, HIST-310, WS-110

  
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    WS 319 - Survey of Women’s Lit


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: ENGL-101, ENGL-104, or ENGL-204H; Minimum grade C-
    A study of the English and American traditions of literature by women. The course focuses on literary analysis and appreciation of fiction, poetry, memoirs, essays, and drama by classical and contemporary authors. The roles of women as authors and as characters will be considered within their historical and literary contexts.

    Fulfills Humanities Requirement.
    Cross-listed: ENGL-119, ENGL-319, WS-119

  
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    WS 324 - Women in Media


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course surveys the changing ways women and the women’s movement have been depicted by the media over the years. Special focus is placed on the media’s treatment of women as consumers, employees, and advertising targets. The course also examines the vital roles that women have played in the development and popularization of newspapers, magazines, film, radio, and television. Lectures, discussions, readings, research, videotapes, movies, and guest appearances by women currently working in media are part of the course content.

    Fulfills Social Science Requirement.
    Cross-listed: COMM-324

  
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    WS 328 - Women in Sacred Writing


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course provides an in-depth study of the historical roots and societal context of women’s religious experience in the traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. By using the Hebrew scriptures, the Christian New Testament, and the Islamic Koran, students explore the major contributions women have made and are making in humanity’s ongoing effort to understand and interpret faith.

    Fulfills Humanities Requirement.
    Cross-listed: HUM-328, REL-328

  
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    WS 351 - Introduction to Women’s Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
    This course uses theoretical frameworks from sociology and social psychology to examine women’s issues and roles in contemporary society as well as their contributions to various disciplines. Topics include socialization, communication, health, media, leadership, sexual harassment, and violence. Women’s contributions to history, politics, education, and science are highlighted.

    Fulfills Social Science Requirement.
    Cross-listed: WS-251, SOC-351, SOC-351

  
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    WS 354 - Gender Roles


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: SOC-101; Minimum grade C
    This course examines major explanations of gender roles in society, with special focus on social institutions and the media.

    Fulfills Social Science Requirement.
    Cross-listed: SOC-354

  
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    WS 397 - Special Studies


    Credits: Three (3)
  
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    WS 420 - Psychology of Women


    Credits: Three (3)
    Prerequisite: PSYC-101; Minimum grade C-
    This course provides an opportunity to apply critical thinking and principles of feminist psychology to evaluating psychological theories and research in the areas of psychological development and functioning of women.

    Fulfills Social Science Requirement.
    Cross-listed: PSYC-420

 

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